All Posts Tagged: podiatry

Diabetes foot disease

What do your feet have to do with diabetes?

When it comes to our feet, we rarely think about diabetes.

Instead, things like calluses and ingrown toenails usually spring to mind. So what do our feet have to do with diabetes?

There are vast numbers of Australians with diabetes, pre-diabetes or undiagnosed diabetes. As a result, many of us are living with diabetes foot disease – and some of us don’t even know it!

Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and, in extreme cases, amputations. That’s why looking after your feet is really important.

In fact, Diabetes Australia recommends that everyone with diabetes sees a podiatrist regularly.

To delve into the issue further, our Podiatrists from PridePlus Health, Tim Mulholland and Gus McSweyn, recently had a chat.

Read on to find out how diabetes can affect your feet, and how you can get help.

A conversation about diabetes and your feet

Tim: Alright Gus, as podiatrists we know that feet are super-important to managing diabetes as a whole. It’s difficult to exercise when our feet are sore! Not only that, our feet can tell us about diabetes disease progression before other symptoms occur.

Gus: Yeah, that’s true. There’s actually a lot that goes into a Diabetes Foot Risk Assessment. Let’s break down two of the main testing parts – I’ll take circulation, and you can talk about sensation.

Tim: Perfect. Talk us through circulation then, Gus.

Gus: Circulation is really a round-about way of describing the vascular or plumbing system of the body. The heart is the strong pump that sends oxygen and nutrient-rich blood around our bodies under high pressure. We also have the arteries which are flexible, elastic-like pipes which carry it to the farthest reaches of our bodies.

Tim: That’s the tips of the toes!

Gus: Yeah, that’s it. If the circulation system isn’t working due to a blockage in the arteries or the pump malfunctioning then we don’t get all that good stuff getting to the toes. In the worst cases, your toes can suffer tissue death and drop off. In earlier stages, we get things like cramps, aches, fragile skin and nails, and internal injuries to bones and tendons, which occur more easily and take longer to recover from.

Tim: And as podiatrists in Pascoe Vale we get to see a lot of feet, feel their temperatures and pulses but even more importantly – measure the pressure of the blood flowing to the tips of the toes.

Diabetes foot disease

Tim and Gus sit down to talk diabetes.

Gus: Our circulation testing gives us really accurate information on the amount of blood flowing to the toes. It also allows us to track changes over time. If we do the tests at least annually we can pick up changes occurring well before any nasty complications occur. We can then act accordingly.

Tim: That’s great information. While the sensation system is no less important and has many more complex relationships than just the following, I’ll try to keep it brief.

Gus: Let’s hear it then!

Tim: If you can’t feel things, you don’t know if problems are occurring. Pain is a gift (and a curse). Also, if you can’t feel things you don’t always know you can’t feel things. Podiatry tests will give you accurate, repeatable and consistent data to check this against.

Gus: Very true. So as a recap, diabetes foot disease can be really nasty, but mostly preventable with sound early assessments and interventions. If you have diabetes you really should see us for minimum annual assessments and then semi-regular to regular check-ups to make sure everything stays under control.

Tim: There’s heaps of great information out there about what to do, and a good podiatrist will tailor their advice to you, your feet, your risk level and work with you on areas that need improvement. Check out this information about why you should have a diabetes foot risk assessment and some advice from Diabetes Australia about what to do at home as well.

Preventing diabetes foot disease is key

Don’t let the mostly preventable and manageable complications of diabetes foot disease affect you.

If you’re due for your diabetes foot risk assessment, or need any assistance with foot and ankle-related issues, you can book online or call us on 9304 0500 to get assessed.

Your health is precious. Look after yourself!

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Pascoe Vale gym

The Strong Room – our specialised gym in Pascoe Vale

At PVH Medical, we understand that exercising and working towards optimal health can be hard.

Life is busy. Sometimes we are sick. And sometimes we are injured.

Fortunately, we have a fully equipped gym called The Strong Room and some caring professionals to help you with any challenges you face.

The Strong Room is different to big, unfriendly gyms where you’re left to your own devices. Our health professionals work with you, your needs, and your abilities to offer different solutions to achieve your goals.

Hear what some of our team have to say.

Physiotherapist Naveena Seethapathy

Physio Pascoe Vale

How do you use The Strong Room?

It’s great to have access to a large space for our rehab. Physiotherapy can involve some one-on-one manual (hands-on) work which we do in our dedicated clinical rooms. When it comes to rehab there’s only so much you can do with rubber bands in a small room. The Strong Room allows me to find safe loads to build strength, flexibility and capacity in my clients as they overcome their injuries.

What can you help people with?

I’m here for you when you’re sore. Any musculoskeletal and sporting injury, really.

I work closely with Mike the EP a lot where initially a client comes to me with an acute injury – pain. We then work on diagnosis and commence therapy to get on top of that early pain.

As a client’s rehab progresses they will often move over to Mike for further exercise therapy/rehab. This is where they can focus on bigger-picture movements, activities and exercises, usually doing an individualised program in a group setting.

I can also help people with returning to sports after an injury, injuries sustained at work, road traffic accidents, as well as improving performance.

How do people find you?

Upstairs at PVH Medical! You can book your appointments on the PVH Medical website, on Facebook or by calling the reception team on 9304 0500. I’m in clinic Monday, Wednesday and Friday with some later appointments for those coming in after school or work.

Read more about physiotherapy in Pascoe Vale

Exercise Physiologist (EP) Mike Fitzsimon

Exercise physiologist Pascoe Vale

How do you use The Strong Room?

The Strong Room is my clinical ‘home’. As the Exercise physiologist (EP) at PVH Medical my priority is enabling our community to experience their own personal journey of self-discovery through exercise.

The Strong Room is an innovative, safe and enjoyable place to learn how to condition your body and mind with evidence-based exercise. I consult one-on-one with people injured, needing assistance managing chronic disease (such as diabetes, arthritis, depression and so many more) and those looking to re-engage with exercise again after falling off the wagon.

I also run group exercise classes in The Strong Room where up to six people perform their individualised plan. The groups are heaps of fun and a great place to work out, get healthy, get better and connect with other like-minded people.

Some of our classes are targeted for specific people. We run Strong To The Bone for those at risk of falls and fractures relating to decreased muscle and bone strength. All classes are really inclusive, with each participant completing their personal programs for weight loss, increased strength, managing persistent pain, anything and everything that exercise can have a positive influence on (which is pretty much everything!).

The pilates reformers are also handy tools for us to adjust the load we place on our bodies for rehab. Very useful.

I also use our Wii Fit Balance board and force platform. For those needing variety, we can use technology to enable improvements in lower limb conditioning and improved balance. This is useful for those clients with specific balance deficits or lower limb issues.

What can you help people with?

The list is so long. The right exercises are needed to assist with pretty much any health or lifestyle condition. If we just look at the eight most common chronic conditions – which together affect a staggering 50% of Australians – exercise has proven benefits for all of them.

These include cancer, cardiovascular disease, mental health, arthritis, back pain, lung disease, asthma and diabetes.

Chances are if you’re looking to achieve a goal that is health, fitness or wellness related, I can help you get there.

How do people find you?

You can phone 9304 0500 or book online on the PVH Medical website. I have hours available during the day as well as after hours for those trying to fit work, life, kids and grandkids around their schedules.

Read more about exercise physiology in Pascoe Vale

Podiatrist Gus McSweyn

Podiatrist Pascoe Vale

How do you use The Strong Room?

For us podiatrists, we use the space in The Strong Room to complete gait (movement) assessments on the treadmill where we record people walking and running, and work out why they are suffering and implement changes from there.

Often these changes are relating to building strength in lower limb muscles. There’s plenty of steps, weights, balance mats and other equipment where we can get started.

Using video capture we can really slow down and get detailed running gait analysis. We can use this as part of our assessments and to re-train movement patterns as well.

I’m also a keen runner and play footy myself. The Strong Room is a great place for me to personally rehab any niggles that hit me in my old age!

What can you help people with?

A lot! Lower limb, foot and ankle issues. Podiatrists see plenty of people with foot, heel and ankle pain but that’s not all. We have heaps of experience (as well as evidence) that the interventions we use including strengthening muscles, footwear prescription and orthotics are beneficial for knee pain, shin pain and even hip/lower back issues.

I have a passion to help out runners as well. The treadmill in The Strong Room allows us to do some gait re-training where we can adjust and coach technique to reduce pain from injuries, risk of injuries and even lean towards enhancing performance.

How do people find you?

You can book by calling the lovely reception team on 9304 0500, visiting the PVH Medical website or via the Appointuit app on your smartphone.

Read more about podiatry in Pascoe Vale

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Podiatry Melbourne

5 tips to keep your feet happy while travelling

Are you going on summer holidays? Think feet first and get yourself sorted before your trip gets ruined.

1. Sort out your feet before you leave

If you’re experiencing any pain or niggles, make sure you book your podiatry appointment well ahead of your travels to allow for any follow-up to be made, and treatments to help. If you have corns, calluses or irritating nails, these can cause blisters or infections while you travel. Don’t forget to bring the footwear to your appointment that you’ll be wearing whilst away.

2. Breaking in shoes

The footwear you plan on taking on holidays with you is super important. Take time leading up to your trip to increase your activities in these shoes and try swapping socks around too to work out the best combinations.

3. Reduce swelling, cramping and muscle pain

All three can be addressed by investing in support stockings. During long flights, when you’re sitting upright and are inactive for a long period of time (that’s pretty much any flight from Australia to anywhere!), your circulation slows down. Get measured for the correct size support stockings so you don’t land in pain.

4. Avoid nasty infections

Pools, spas and hotel showers are warm and moist environments, just perfect for picking up tinea (athlete’s foot) and also plantar warts (Verruca). Throw a pair of thongs in your luggage and you’ll be fine.

5. Blister management

That blister you get on day one will still be annoying you on day ten. Preventing blisters is the key. Blister management in tropical climates is particularly important with all sorts of tropical bugs wanting to set up camp in your blistered skin.

Simple things to remember:

  • Avoid ill-fitting shoes that are either too loose or too tight
  • Avoid wearing socks and shoes that are wet – change them if your feet get sweaty or you get caught in the rain
  • Try alternating footwear up to reduce pressures on the same areas
  • Socks can reduce friction and blisters on the feet by reducing the moisture and friction on the surface of the foot. Look for socks that wick away moisture from the foot surface and socks that keep their shape and fit, to avoid any wrinkling and bunching
  • If you do get caught with a blister, resist the urge to pop it and pick at it. Dress the area and keep it clean.

Make a booking today

Get your feet checked by one of our podiatrists today. Simply book online or call 9304 0500.

Happy travels!

 

Source: PridePlus Health

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Pascoe Vale podiatry.

How healthy are your feet?

According to the Australian Podiatry Association, one in five Australians suffer from foot pain.

Podiatry is about more than just the foot, however, it’s about uncovering the root cause for pain anywhere from your lower back down.

Podiatrists are the experts in foot and lower limb health. They assess, diagnose and prescribe treatment plans so you can continue living an active, pain-free lifestyle.

Podiatrists are fundamental to getting people moving and active, preventing injuries and prolonging healthy lives.

Growing demand for podiatry

In recent years, the demand for podiatric care in Australia has increased significantly. Contributing factors include our aging population and the increase in the number of Australians diagnosed with diabetes.

An astounding 4,400 diabetic amputations occur in Australia every year. Most of these can be prevented through proper podiatric care.

October is Foot Health Month

Foot Health Month is a national campaign that aims to raise awareness for foot health, highlighting the benefits and importance of visiting a podiatrist as part of your annual health check.

From children and athletes right through to seniors and those suffering from chronic illness, a visit to the podiatrist can have a positive impact on people’s lives.

Make an appointment with a podiatrist in Pascoe Vale

If you have ongoing pain in your foot, ankle or knee or have noticed a change in the way your walk, make a booking with one of our on-site podiatrists at Pride Podiatry.

You may have podiatry cover under your Extras health insurance policy to help cover some of the cost. No referral is needed. Appointments can be made online too or on the Appointuit app.

See a podiatrist today as part of your regular health check.

Pride Podiatry Pascoe Vale.

 

Source: Australian Podiatry Association

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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