All Posts Tagged: pain

Healthy new year’s resolutions

5 healthy new year’s resolutions for you and your family

New year’s resolutions are a great idea. After all, what better way to start the new year than with a fresh outlook on life?

In reality, however, new year’s resolutions often don’t last because they’re unrealistic and poorly executed. With this in mind, we’ve put together a list of achievable, healthy resolutions for you and your family to try.

Let us know how you go!

Say goodbye to fad diets

Losing weight is a common new year’s resolution. But instead of following the latest diet craze, focus your efforts on eating simple, healthy food like fruit and vegies as much as you can. Just one extra serve of vegies a day can make a big difference, says PVH Medical Dietitian, Jessica Fuller. “It can reduce your risk of mortality by 5% which is pretty impressive,” she says.

Find a gym buddy or do group exercises

We all know that going to the gym can be daunting. But what if a friend came along with you? Your buddy can keep you accountable for meeting your goals. You could also consider a group exercise class, like the one we run at our practice in Pascoe Vale. Qualified exercise physiologist Mike Fitzsimon runs classes every week. “Group exercise classes are a great way to prevent injuries and chronic diseases,” Mike says.

Ask for help if you need it

Life can throw us some curveballs, causing problems at home, work or school. Often the hardest step is the first step – asking for help. Family, friends and loved ones can offer a great support network. But if you feel like you’ve got no one to turn to, or you need extra support, you can always seek professional help. The team of psychologists at PVH Medical – Bronwen Francis, Julie Paschke and Jenny Ricketts – treat each client with respect and dignity. “Every discussion is kept confidential,” Bronwen adds.

Help your child with developmental delays

Do you have kids? If so, you want them to get the best start in life. This includes ensuring that they keep developing as they grow older. Developmental delays like speech and language problems can be addressed by working with a qualified speech pathologist. With 20 year’s clinical experience, PVH Medical Speech Pathologist Naomi DeNicolo can help your child with speech and/or language difficulties, and even with problems swallowing food or drink.

Get that niggling pain looked at

Life’s too short to put up with niggling pain. Whether you have a sore back, an injured knee or even a headache, seeing a physiotherapist can help. We recently welcomed Naveena Seethapathy to the PVH Medical team. For Naveena, physiotherapy has been a career where she has found her calling to help those injured or in pain. “It’s never too late to seek help for niggling pain,” says Naveena.

Are you ready for a healthy 2019?

So there you have it – five healthy new year’s resolutions anyone can achieve.

If you need help with any of them, we’d be pleased to help. Simply call 9304 0500 or make an online booking today.

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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PVH Medical doctors in Pascoe Vale can help with chronic pain management

What is chronic pain and how do you manage it?

Most of us think of pain as a result of an injury or disease. We expect it will go away once we have medical treatment or the injury heals.

For many people, this is the case. However for others, the pain doesn’t go away. In some cases, you can have pain even without an injury or obvious body damage.

This ongoing type of pain is called chronic pain. It’s estimated that one in three Australians live with chronic pain.

Acute pain and chronic pain – what’s the difference?

  • Acute pain is usually short term. It tends to be more associated with damage to the body, and will usually go away after healing. Acute pain is a very important alarm system – it alerts us that some action is needed.
  • Chronic pain lasts longer, beyond the time you would expect an injury to heal. Chronic pain often does not indicate ongoing damage in our body – it’s like the alarm has been left on and someone’s turned the volume up. The pain is less to do with an injury to body tissue and more to do with what’s happening in our nervous system.

How long does chronic pain last?

Chronic pain can last for more than three months, or in many cases, beyond normal healing time. It doesn’t obey the same rules as acute pain.

The longer pain persists, the more complex it becomes. Even if it is caused by a disease, it now involves multiple body systems beyond the nervous system.

People can have different pain experiences

Everyone’s experience of pain is different. Two people with the same injury, such as a sprained ankle, can have a very different pain experience.

This is because pain is complex – how we perceive pain involves an interaction between our mind and our body.

How do you manage chronic pain?

Because chronic pain is complex, there is no ‘one size fits all’ way of treating it.

To be successful pain managers, we may have to use a combination of things such as:

  • Medication
  • Exercise
  • Diet
  • Relaxation
  • Thinking strategies.

Over time, you can turn down the volume of your pain.

At PVH Medical, our doctors work alongside our on-site allied health professionals as a multidisciplinary team. This means you may also get help from a physiotherapist, exercise physiologist, podiatrist, psychologist, speech therapist or dietitian, in addition to your GP.

This can help produce the best results.

National Pain Week

Each year Chronic Pain Australia, the national voice of people living with chronic pain, organises National Pain Week to champion the needs of the many Australians living with some form of chronic pain.

In 2019, it runs from 22-28 July. You can share your experience of chronic pain by using #PAINWEEK2019 on social media.

One thing to remember

Chronic pain can be overwhelming and affect all aspects of your life.

However, with time, perseverance, and support from others (including your GP and allied health professionals), you can turn down the volume of your pain and get back to an enjoyable life.

 

Source: National Pain Week

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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