All Posts Tagged: dietitian

Pascoe Vale dietitian

Smart, healthy eating – do you do it?

Eating well is key to feeling your best, both now and in the long term.

We know healthy eating plays an important role in keeping your body healthy and strong, as well as preventing illness.

Go for 2 and 5

Eating 2 serves of fruit and at least 5 serves of vegetables each day is the single most important dietary change we can make to be healthier. But how do we fit them all in?

Spreading fruit and vegies over breakfast, lunch and dinner (plus snacks if you need them) makes it easier to get our 2 fruit and 5 vegies per day.

Not sure what constitutes one serve? You can find out here.

Clever ways to enjoy more fruit and veg

Try the following simple meal and snack ideas. They will not only help you get your 2&5 but can save you time, money and even help shrink your waistline!

  • Chop vegies ahead of time and store them in containers in the fridge
  • Buy fruit and vegies that are in season – it’s cheaper and they’re generally tastier
  • Look for fruit and vegies that are cheaper per kilogram or unit
  • Try steaming some frozen vegies in the microwave or adding to a stir-fry when you’re pressed for time
  • Canned fruit and vegies are also good options to have on hand (choose canned fruit in natural juice or water, and canned vegetables with no added salt)
  • Try steaming, grilling, baking or stir-frying with just a small amount of oil
  • Make fruit and vegies more fun for kids, like cutting them into interesting shapes.

Healthy Eating Quiz

The Healthy Eating Quiz is a general guide, designed to help you rate how healthy your eating habits are. It will help to identify areas in which you’re already eating a wide variety of foods and areas where you may be able to improve.

At the end of the quiz, you will receive a score with general feedback on your current eating patterns. It will also give you suggestions for ways to increase the variety of foods in your diet.

If you have any questions about your score, or for tailored advice on healthy eating, please make a booking with our in-house dietitian, Jessica Fuller.

How does your diet stack up? Take the Healthy Eating Quiz now to find out.

Smart Eating Week

When it comes to food and nutrition, do you know how to make the right choices for you?

Find the answer to your questions by participating in Smart Eating Week! It runs from 11-17 February, 2019.

You can get involved by spreading the word, attending an event, reading up on smart eating, as well as joining the conversation on social media with hashtag #SmartEatingWeek.

We make getting dietary advice easy

For dietary advice and nutritional wellbeing, make a booking today with our in-house dietitian, Jessica Fuller. You can book online – it’s easy!

 

Source: Dietitians Association of Australia and SA Health

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Summer recipe

Summer recipe: Potato salad with egg

Give this nutritious summer recipe a go!

It serves six people.

Ingredients

  • 8 eggs
  • 8 medium Carisma potatoes, or red skinned potatoes, washed
  • 200g baby spinach leaves, roughly chopped
  • ¼ common cabbage, thinly shredded (i.e. with mandolin)
  • 1 small red onion, diced very small
  • 1 bunch of red radishes, washed and sliced very thinly (i.e. with mandolin)
  • 1 cup of finely diced pickles
  • ½ punnet of dill, leaves picked
  • ½ punnet of chives, chopped thinly.

Dressing

  • ¾ cup natural yoghurt or runny cottage cheese (low fat or full fat)
  • 1tbs mayonnaise (low fat or full fat)
  • 2tbs lemon juice
  • 1tbs apple cider vinegar
  • 1tbs Dijon mustard.

 Method

  1. Prepare the potatoes: Dice with the peel on, then steam for 6 minutes, or until tender. Set aside to cool. Meanwhile, boil the eggs for 8 minutes, cool, then peel. Set aside.
  2. While eggs and potatoes are cooking/cooling, prepare the remaining salad ingredients using a mandolin or chopping aid for assistance (optional). Transfer all salad ingredients to a large bowl.
  3. Prepare the dressing – in a blender, combine all ingredients and add water, as desired, to reach a pouring consistency.
  4. Once potatoes and eggs have cooled, add to the salad bowl, toss gently to combine. Store until ready to eat. Top with 2tbs dressing and serve.

And there you have it! Enjoy.

Have you seen our tasty tuna nicoise recipe?

Need help with your diet?

Our in-house dietitian Jessica Fuller would be pleased to assist you. Book online or call 9304 0500 today.

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Summer recipe

Summer recipe: Tuna Nicoise salad

Here’s another yummy, healthy recipe to enjoy this summer.

It serves four people.

Ingredients

  • 400g baby Carisma potatoes, halved
  • 400g green beans, trimmed
  • 400g tinned tuna in spring water, drained & flaked
  • 400g cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 Spanish onion, finely sliced
  • 2 baby cos lettuces, shredded
  • 4 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and quartered
  • Olives (optional).

Dressing

  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 2 tsp red wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard.

Method

  1. To make the dressing, whisk oil, vinegar and mustard in a jug. Season with salt and pepper. Alternatively, use Praise 100% fat-free French dressing or balsamic vinegar.
  2. Cook potatoes in a large pot of boiling water for 10 minutes or until just tender. Transfer to a large bowl. Add beans to pot. Boil for 2 to 3 minutes or until bright green and just tender, then drain and refresh under cold water. Add beans to potato.
  3. Add tuna, tomatoes, lettuce, onion, eggs and olives (optional) to potato and bean mixture. Add 2 tsp dressing to your single serve (leftover salad will keep for another three days). Toss gently to combine and season with salt and pepper to serve.

And voila! Enjoy this nutritious salad.

Have you seen our tasty potato salad recipe?

Need help with your diet?

Our in-house dietitian Jessica Fuller would be pleased to assist you. Book online or call 9304 0500 today.

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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dietitian Melbourne

It’s National Nutrition Week!

Looking for an easy way to improve your nutrition? Ready to make some small changes for big gains?

Then look no further than this year’s National Nutrition Week campaign: Try for 5. It encourages all Aussies to have five serves of vegetables a day.

We’ve all heard it before: eating more vegetables is the number one strategy to improve health and lose weight.

But how else are they beneficial?

Eating vegetables can reduce chronic disease

Having more vegies in our diet can reduce the risk of chronic disease. This includes coronary heart disease, stroke, some cancers and type 2 diabetes.

Eating vegetables can help fight depression

New emerging evidence has found that eating vegetables helps improve mood and reduces the risk of depression. And yet, only 4% of Australians are eating enough vegetables!

That means a lot of us are missing out on essential nutrients that help us to function properly including vitamins and minerals (e.g. vitamin C, magnesium and folate), phytonutrients, antioxidants and dietary fibre.

How many vegetables are we eating?

The average Australian is only eating about half the amount of vegetables that they should be.

This is leading to an increased number of cases of obesity, chronic diseases and poor mental health (including an impact on memory and learning).

Not only are we missing out on essential nutrients available in vegetables, we are replacing our vegetable intake with processed foods that are high in unhealthy fats, salt and sugar (not so great for our health).

One extra serve can help

Did you know that just one extra serve of vegies a day can reduce your risk of mortality by 5%? That’s pretty impressive.

Imagine how your health would improve if you had five serves of vegies every single day!

A serve of vegetables includes:

  • ½ cup of cooked green or orange vegetables (such as broccoli, spinach, carrots and pumpkin)
  • ½ cup of cooked dried or canned beans, peas or lentils
  • 1 cup of green leafy or raw salad vegetables
  • ½ cup sweet corn
  • 1 medium potato or other starchy vegetable (sweet potato, taro and cassava)
  • 1 medium tomato.

So, now that you know how important vegies are, how can you start having more of them? Simply read our eight tips for increasing vegetable intake every day.

Getting nutrition advice is easy

For help and advice about eating more vegetables to improve your diet, make an appointment with our in-house dietitian today.

 

Source: The Nutrition Code

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Know how to read food labels

Reading food labels – a quick guide

When it comes to healthy eating, it’s best to include as many unpackaged, wholefood options as possible.

However, if you know what to look for, you can find equally nutritious and convenient options in the supermarket. The trick is learning how to read food labels!

Here are a few quick tips to help you make smarter choices, and avoid unnecessary saturated fat, salt, sugars and kilojoules (or calories).

Understanding the Nutrition Information Panel (NIP)

One of the first things people turn to when assessing the quality of a food product is the Nutrition Information Panel (NIP).

Various institutions, such as Baker IDI, the Heart Foundation and the Dietitians Association of Australia have developed healthy criteria for NIPs, and these are:

  • Saturated fat: <2g/100g as best choice, or less than 30% of the total fat content per 100g (i.e. in a product with 10g/100g total fat, aim for <3g/100g saturated fat)
  • Sugars: <15g/100g as best choice, or <20g/100g if the food product contains fruit as a primary ingredient (i.e. an untoasted muesli, raw food bars).
  • Sodium: <120mg/100g best choice, and <400mg/100g as acceptable choice (i.e. for breads, crackers, tinned soups)
  • Fibre: >5g/100g, only applicable to grain products such as bread, cereal, crackers, pasta, grains.
  • Kilojoules/Calories: Aim for <600kJ or <150cal per serve for snacks (i.e. yogurts, muesli bars), and <2,000kj or <450 calories serve for ready meals (i.e. frozen meals).

Once you have compared a food product to the above criteria, you can also use the NIP to compare this product to similar products.

Opt for the product containing less saturated fat, sodium (salt), sugars and kilojoules, and more fibre.

Use the per serve column to compare items in single-serve packaging (i.e. single yoghurts or muesli bars), and the per 100g column to compare items without single serve packaging (i.e. cereals, table spreads).

Often products will meet some, but not all, health criteria. Either continue looking for other options or choose the closest match.

For more food label tips, head over to The Nutrition Code.

Make a booking with our in-house dietitian

Make a booking today to see our resident dietitian, Samantha Stuk. You can do this online, on Facebook, on the Appointuit app or by calling 9304 0500.

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs. © The Nutrition Code.

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Learn how to eat healthy food with a dietitian in Pascoe Vale.

Smart eating – everyone can do it

Smart eating is a means to good nutrition, a key step towards better health for everyone.

But because we’re all unique, with differing health challenges, goals and lifestyles (for example), smart eating will mean different things to different people, and how we go about achieving it will be different too. That’s where personalised nutrition advice and support from an Accredited Practising Dietitian comes in.

How can an Accredited Practising Dietitian help?

Accredited Practising Dietitians have a lot to offer in supporting you to live a healthier life, through smart eating.

They’re nutrition scientists with at least four years’ study behind them in nutrition, food science and biochemistry. And they have the know-how to translate the science into personalised, practical advice, respecting your values and preferences, to find the best approach for you.

Importantly, they can support and motivate you to make smart eating a part of your life over the long term.

More information on dietetics

Fast facts about Accredited Practising Dietitians

Australia’s more than 5,500 dietitians work in a range of areas, including hospitals (36%), community settings (9%), private practice (31%), universities (6%), government (4%), non-government organisations (5%) and the corporate sector (5%).

But what all Accredited Practising Dietitians have in common is they:

  • Have a university degree in nutrition and dietetics
  • Give advice based on scientific evidence
  • Stay up to date through continuing professional development, and
  • Adhere to a Code of Conduct and Statement of Ethical Practice.

Smart Eating Week

They say to work smarter, not harder – but when it comes to food and nutrition, are you left wondering how to make the right choices for you?

12-18 February 2018 is Smart Eating Week. The week is run by Accredited Practising Dietitians, and supported by the Dietitians Association of Australia. The week falls at an ideal time, with the start of a new year inspiring many of us to live healthier lives, including through smart eating.

So get smart this Smart Eating Week. Connect with our Practising Dietitian at PVH Medical, Samantha Stuk.

Samamtha-Stuk

Samantha can help with nutritional well-being, treating disease, preventing nutrition-related problems, and more.

It’s easy to make a booking

It’s easy to make a booking with Samantha. You can do it online, on Facebook, on the Appointuit app on your smartphone, or you can call us on 9304 0500.

Happy Smart Eating Week!

 

Source: Dieticians Association of Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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