All Posts Tagged: diabetes

Physio Pascoe Vale

Building your buckets (how physio can help with diabetes)

A condition that physiotherapists often treat is called tendinopathy.

Also known as tendinitis, it’s a tendon disorder that results in pain, swelling, and impaired function.

People with diabetes are at a much higher risk of developing tendinopathy than those without diabetes.

Most tendinopathies take months to rehabilitate and get back to full, pain-free function. That’s why finding out what you can do to reduce your risk is really important.

The bucket analogy

To develop a tendinopathy you have to ask your tendon to do more work than it can handle, consistently.

Think of the tendon working as filling up a bucket. Each contraction leads to a little more water filling the bucket.

Contract and load equals a splash more in the bucket.

Contract and load again equals another splash.

When the bucket is full, the metaphorical tendon it represents is also full of work. This is where tendinopathy and pain often starts.

All of us have tendons which can do bucket loads of work. Where diabetes comes in is the size of the bucket – it’s much smaller.

We know from research and clinical practice that if you have diabetes your ability to work your tendons is reduced. In other words, your bucket size is smaller.

This sounds like bad news but there is a silver lining.

You can increase your bucket size

That’s right. You can increase your tendon’s ability to tolerate load.

How? With exercises and training.

Pre-injury, this can be guided by exercise physiology (EP) and is often part of a regular exercise routine. Loading muscles, bones and tendons together increase their ability to work.

When you’re injured, trying to live your life with a full bucket of work in your tendons means you need to get really specific with its management.

With the help of our physiotherapist, Naveena Seethapathy, a little bit of work can be taken out of your overloaded tendon, the work can be removed completely, or moved to another bucket (tendon).

This might be hands-on therapy, gait or movement re-training, shoe or aid use. Naveena can then work on that bucket capacity by training your sore tendon to be able to do more work in the future.

Physio Pascoe Vale

Pascoe Vale physio, Naveena Seethapathy

Help for those in pain

For those with diabetes, tackling full-bucket tendinopathies via this structured and evidence-based approach is proven to be the most effective method of treating tendinopathy.

You also get some great side effects. Those relating to building bigger buckets include:

  • Increased lean muscle mass
  • Increased physical activity
  • Decreased usage of medications.

This can have a profound effect on your life, even if it just means you can now go for a walk to the shops!

Want to get on top of your pain?

If you want to build bigger buckets and get on top of your tendon pain, make a booking with our physiotherapist, Naveena, today.

The quickest way to do this is by tapping on ‘Book an Appointment’ on our website. We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Targeted exercise to help diabetes

How exercise physiology can help with diabetes (some things may surprise you)

The single factor that links all chronic disease management is exercise.

It’s a word we all know, and a concept we’ve had relationships with in the past.

The challenge for those living with diabetes is how to get the correct ‘dosage’ of exercise. What types of exercise – walking, running, skipping? Should you be lifting heavy weights or light weights? What about pilates? And what about the fads – is Zumba the best exercise for diabetes?

All of these questions have an answer. And that answer will differ from person to person.

An exercise physiologist, also known as an EP, is the professional to give you your exercise answers.

Here are four common questions our EP, Mike Fitzsimon, gets asked about diabetes. The answers may surprise you!

1. Why exercise?

Diabetes Australia recommends that everyone with diabetes does at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise every day. That’s right – every single day.

If weight loss is needed as well, then that number increases to 45-60 minutes of exercise every day.

Exercise has many positive effects on muscles, bones, joints, organs and even our brain.

With diabetes it improves our ability to process and use carbohydrates, and increases muscle and other tissue mass to better process carbs in the future. These are just some of the positive effects.

2. How do I reach my recommended exercise minimums every day?

Your EP will sit down with you and work through your history, your days, the barriers and the opportunities that you have to exercise.

They will work out what kind of exercise is best and what you like the most, and avoid what you like the least.

Exercise physiology in Pascoe Vale, Melbourne.

Exercise physiologist Mike Fitzsimon

3. Why do my blood sugars drop when exercising?

This goes back to the understanding around blood sugars being our first fuel source. When we exercise, we use the sugars as fuel.

If we don’t use them, we convert the sugars to other substances including the bad fats that float around and clog up blood vessels as well as sit around our vital organs. This can lead to high disease risks.

4. If I’m walking every day, is this enough exercise? 

The answer is no.

We all, and especially those with diabetes, need to be completing two sessions of resistance training per week as well as the daily 30 minutes of aerobic exercise.

Resistance exercises are where you use your body weight, actual weights and resistance training bands, and work muscles through their ranges to build strength and conditioning.

We’re here to help

If you’re reading this and thinking that you need some assistance meeting the recommended minimums for your exercise levels, you can rest assured knowing we have the best people qualified to help.

Our EP Mike Fitzsimon is here in Pascoe Vale and ready to help you.

There are many ways you can see Mike. You can come in for one-on-one work where you ask your questions. There’s also the actions that you need to do.

Our EP has The Strong Room where you can complete assessments and do your exercises in safety with an expert guiding you.

You can do these exercises one on one, or join some friendly small groups where you can feel supported and encouraged by others exercising together.

Make a booking today

To see Mike you can book in now online or by calling 9304 0500.

If you’re eligible for Medicare rebates (those with chronic disease, and separately those with diabetes) you can get your doctor to write up referrals. This can unlock some Medicare funding pathways to access exercise physiology.

We’d love to help you on your way to feeling great. Why not get started today?

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Diabetes foot disease

What do your feet have to do with diabetes?

When it comes to our feet, we rarely think about diabetes.

Instead, things like calluses and ingrown toenails usually spring to mind. So what do our feet have to do with diabetes?

There are vast numbers of Australians with diabetes, pre-diabetes or undiagnosed diabetes. As a result, many of us are living with diabetes foot disease – and some of us don’t even know it!

Having diabetes can increase your risk of foot ulcers and, in extreme cases, amputations. That’s why looking after your feet is really important.

In fact, Diabetes Australia recommends that everyone with diabetes sees a podiatrist regularly.

To delve into the issue further, our Podiatrists from PridePlus Health, Tim Mulholland and Gus McSweyn, recently had a chat.

Read on to find out how diabetes can affect your feet, and how you can get help.

A conversation about diabetes and your feet

Tim: Alright Gus, as podiatrists we know that feet are super-important to managing diabetes as a whole. It’s difficult to exercise when our feet are sore! Not only that, our feet can tell us about diabetes disease progression before other symptoms occur.

Gus: Yeah, that’s true. There’s actually a lot that goes into a Diabetes Foot Risk Assessment. Let’s break down two of the main testing parts – I’ll take circulation, and you can talk about sensation.

Tim: Perfect. Talk us through circulation then, Gus.

Gus: Circulation is really a round-about way of describing the vascular or plumbing system of the body. The heart is the strong pump that sends oxygen and nutrient-rich blood around our bodies under high pressure. We also have the arteries which are flexible, elastic-like pipes which carry it to the farthest reaches of our bodies.

Tim: That’s the tips of the toes!

Gus: Yeah, that’s it. If the circulation system isn’t working due to a blockage in the arteries or the pump malfunctioning then we don’t get all that good stuff getting to the toes. In the worst cases, your toes can suffer tissue death and drop off. In earlier stages, we get things like cramps, aches, fragile skin and nails, and internal injuries to bones and tendons, which occur more easily and take longer to recover from.

Tim: And as podiatrists in Pascoe Vale we get to see a lot of feet, feel their temperatures and pulses but even more importantly – measure the pressure of the blood flowing to the tips of the toes.

Diabetes foot disease

Tim and Gus sit down to talk diabetes.

Gus: Our circulation testing gives us really accurate information on the amount of blood flowing to the toes. It also allows us to track changes over time. If we do the tests at least annually we can pick up changes occurring well before any nasty complications occur. We can then act accordingly.

Tim: That’s great information. While the sensation system is no less important and has many more complex relationships than just the following, I’ll try to keep it brief.

Gus: Let’s hear it then!

Tim: If you can’t feel things, you don’t know if problems are occurring. Pain is a gift (and a curse). Also, if you can’t feel things you don’t always know you can’t feel things. Podiatry tests will give you accurate, repeatable and consistent data to check this against.

Gus: Very true. So as a recap, diabetes foot disease can be really nasty, but mostly preventable with sound early assessments and interventions. If you have diabetes you really should see us for minimum annual assessments and then semi-regular to regular check-ups to make sure everything stays under control.

Tim: There’s heaps of great information out there about what to do, and a good podiatrist will tailor their advice to you, your feet, your risk level and work with you on areas that need improvement. Check out this information about why you should have a diabetes foot risk assessment and some advice from Diabetes Australia about what to do at home as well.

Preventing diabetes foot disease is key

Don’t let the mostly preventable and manageable complications of diabetes foot disease affect you.

If you’re due for your diabetes foot risk assessment, or need any assistance with foot and ankle-related issues, you can book online or call us on 9304 0500 to get assessed.

Your health is precious. Look after yourself!

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Dietitian Melbourne

Is sugar really that bad?

Sugar appears to be in all our food products nowadays.

It’s in obvious sources such as biscuits, soft drinks, chocolate and cakes to less obvious foods like tomato sauce, breakfast cereals and pasta sauce.

Sugar is continuing to build a bad reputation as a contributing factor to many health conditions, and rightly so.

We’re eating lots of processed food

Most of our energy intake is now coming from processed and packaged food and drinks, such as cereal and soft drinks, which may contain added sugar. More than half of Australians are eating more sugar than recommended.

You might be surprised at how many of our food products contain added sugar – even the ones that don’t necessarily taste sweet! And food that is marketed as health food is often packed full of sugar.

Moderate your sugar intake (especially if you have diabetes)

While everyone should be moderating their sugar intake, it’s particularly true for those who are managing diabetes.

Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body is unable to regulate blood sugar levels as a result of an issue with the hormone insulin.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the body does not produce enough insulin, while Type 2 diabetes is where the body is resistant to insulin.

If diabetes is not controlled, blood sugar levels rise. This can cause numerous long-term complications including nerve and blood vessel damage, vision impairment, kidney disease and heart disease.

While eating sugar doesn’t directly cause diabetes, it can lead to gaining weight if eaten in excess, and obesity is a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes.

Pay attention to carbohydrates

Sugar, and carbohydrates in general, are particularly important when managing diabetes.

One of the biggest impacts on our blood sugar levels is what we eat, especially carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, noodles, potato, biscuits, legumes, fruit, cakes etc).

All carbohydrate foods will be broken down into sugar (the simplest form of carbohydrate) in the body once it is consumed, no matter the type of carbohydrate.

Dietitian Pascoe Vale

Once the food is broken down into sugar, it’s absorbed into our blood stream. This is why it’s important to keep an eye on how much sugar and carbohydrates you are eating overall.

Stick to small portions (½-1 cup cooked) of carbohydrate foods at each meal and watch for any extra treats in between meals.

High GI vs low GI

Carbohydrate foods that are higher in simple sugars and low in fibre (white bread, biscuits, soft drink) will have a larger, negative impact on blood sugar levels.

These types of foods are usually referred to as high GI (glycaemic index) and lead to large spikes in blood sugar levels and poorer blood sugar control.

Carbohydrates that contain more fibre and less simple sugars (wholegrain bread, quinoa, legumes) are referred to as low GI, and will not result in large spikes of blood sugar levels.

These are much better choices for blood sugar control. It’s best to eat mainly low GI carbohydrates whenever possible.

Aim for a healthy diet

A healthy diet will lower your diabetes risk or help you to manage the condition better.

Watch portion sizes, opt for plenty of vegetables, include moderate amounts of low GI wholegrains, fruits, healthy fats and lean proteins.

You can still include treats but try to limit portion size and frequency to special occasions!

Got any questions about diabetes? Need help with your diet? Book an appointment with our in-house dietitian in Pascoe Vale today.

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Kidney health Pascoe Vale Melbourne

Kidney disease explained

Each year, more than half a million Australians consult their doctors about kidney disease and urinary tract infections.

One in 3 Australian adults is at increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease, and one in 10 has some sign of chronic kidney disease.

What is kidney disease?

Your kidneys are two bean-shaped organs that act as your body’s waste filtration system. They filter your blood 12 times per hour. Excess water and unwanted chemicals or waste in the blood are disposed of as urine (wee).

Kidney disease is when your kidneys are damaged in some way and are not filtering your blood effectively.

Symptoms of kidney disease

Kidney disease is called a ‘silent disease’ as there are often few or no symptoms. In fact, you can lose up to 90% of your kidneys’ functionality before experiencing any symptoms. Some signs and symptoms include:

  • a change in the frequency and quantity of urine you pass, especially at night (usually an increase at first)
  • blood in your urine (haematuria)
  • changes in the appearance of your urine
  • puffiness around your legs and ankles (oedema)
  • pain in your back (under the lower ribs, where the kidneys are located)
  • pain or burning when you pass urine
  • high blood pressure.

If your kidneys begin to fail, waste products and extra fluid build up in your blood. This, and other problems, can gradually lead to:

  • tiredness and inability to concentrate
  • generally feeling unwell
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • shortness of breath
  • itching
  • bad breath and a metallic taste in the mouth.

Risk factors for kidney disease

You are more at risk of developing chronic kidney disease if you:

  • have high blood pressure
  • have diabetes
  • have established heart problems (heart failure or past heart attack) or have had a stroke
  • are obese
  • are over 60 years of age
  • have a family history of kidney failure
  • smoke
  • have a history of acute kidney injury
  • are of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin.

Take the online kidney risk test.

Prevention of kidney disease

Medication and changes to lifestyle, along with an early referral to a kidney specialist can prevent or delay kidney failure.

Heathy lifestyle choices to keep your kidneys functioning well include:

  • Eat lots of vegetables and fruit, as well as legumes (peas or beans) and grain-based food such as bread, pasta, noodles and rice
  • Eat lean meat such as chicken and fish each week
  • Eat only small amounts of salty or fatty food
  • Drink plenty of water instead of other drinks like sugary soft drinks
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Stay fit. Do at least 30 minutes of physical activity that increases your heart rate on five or more days of the week, including walking, lawn mowing, bike riding, swimming or gentle aerobics
  • Quit smoking (our doctors in Pascoe Vale can help with this)
  • Limit your alcohol to no more than two small drinks per day if you are male, or one small drink per day if you are female.
  • Have your blood pressure checked regularly (a range of medication is available for high blood pressure)
  • Do things that make you happy, help you relax and reduce your stress levels.

Raising awareness for kidney health

14 March 2019 is World Kidney Day. It’s a global awareness campaign aimed at raising awareness of the importance of our kidneys. You can find out more information here.

8-14 April 2019 is Kidney Health Week. ‘Don’t be blind to kidney disease’ is this year’s theme. See if you’re at risk of kidney disease by taking the test.

Treatment for kidney disease

If detected early enough, the progress of kidney disease can be slowed and sometimes even prevented.

Our team of friendly doctors can help you manage kidney disease. Make a booking online or call 9304 0500 today.

 

Source: Kidney Health AustraliaWorld Kidney Day and BetterHealth Channel

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Diabetes help Melbourne

Type 2 diabetes: Australia’s fastest-growing chronic condition

Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the body struggles to regulate its own blood glucose levels.

Early diagnosis, optimal treatment and continued management is key to reducing diabetes-related complications.

Our fastest-growing chronic condition

Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for 85 per cent of all cases, is largely preventable.

It’s a combination of insulin resistance and impaired insulin production, and is strongly associated with high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels, and excess weight (particularly around the waist).

Type 2 Diabetes is Australia’s fastest-growing chronic condition.

Diabetes: A snapshot

  • According to Diabetes Australia, around 1.7 million Australians have diabetes, and a further 2 million are at high risk of developing it.
  • The full cost of diabetes to the Australian economy is estimated to be as high as $14 billion per year
  • The World Health Organisation predicts diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030.

Take a look at the video below to find out more about diabetes and blood glucose levels.

Diabetes is preventable

Research shows type 2 diabetes can be prevented — and even reversed early on — with lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise.

According to Diabetes Australia, a small weight loss (5-10% of your body weight) can make a big difference, and reduce your risk of developing complications like heart disease, stroke and some cancers.

If you need help with your diabetes, or you think you’re at risk, chat with your doctor at PVH Medical.

This is an excerpt from an article in ABC News.

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Diabetes Pascoe Vale Melbourne

Diabetes – are you at risk?

What is diabetes?

Diabetes is a serious and complex condition which can affect the entire body. When someone has diabetes, their body can’t maintain healthy levels of glucose in the blood.

There are three main types of diabetes:

Diabetes is increasing

All types of diabetes are increasing in prevalence; type 2 diabetes is increasing at the fastest rate.

The combination of big changes to diet and the food supply, combined with big changes to physical activity with more sedentary work and less activity, means most populations are seeing more type 2 diabetes.

Genes also play a part with higher risk of type 2 diabetes in Chinese, South Asian, Indian, Pacific Islander and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations.

What are the symptoms of diabetes?

In type 1 diabetes, symptoms are often sudden and can be life-threatening. Therefore, it is usually diagnosed quite quickly.

In type 2 diabetes, many people have no symptoms at all, while other signs can go unnoticed being seen as part of ‘getting older’. Therefore, by the time symptoms are noticed, complications of diabetes may already be present.

Common symptoms include:

  • Being more thirsty than usual
  • Passing more urine
  • Feeling tired and lethargic
  • Always feeling hungry
  • Having cuts that heal slowly
  • Itching, skin infections
  • Blurred vision
  • Unexplained weight loss (type 1)
  • Gradually putting on weight (type 2)
  • Mood swings
  • Headaches
  • Feeling dizzy
  • Leg cramps.

Do the self-assessment now

To find out your risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next five years, answer the quick questions on the Diabetes Australia calculator.

If you have any queries, or you need further support regarding diabetes, please chat with one of our friendly doctors.

 

 

Source: Diabetes Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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