All Posts Tagged: cancer

Bowel cancer Melbourne

Bowel cancer in men

1 in 11 Australian men will develop bowel cancer in their lifetime.

Bowel cancer affects men of all ages and the risk increases every year from age 50. Around 55% of all Australians diagnosed with bowel cancer are men.

The impact of bowel cancer in men

Bowel cancer is the third deadliest cancer in men. It kills more than 2,300 men each year.

More than 8,000 Australian men are diagnosed with the disease each year. Around 15% of those men diagnosed with bowel cancer are under age 55.

Preventing bowel cancer in men

Symptoms

In its early stages bowel cancer often has no obvious symptoms. However, any of the following may be suggestive of bowel cancer:

  • Persistent change in bowel habit (looser more diarrhoea-like bowel movements, constipation, or smaller more frequent bowel movements)
  • Change in appearance of bowel movements
  • Blood in the bowel movement or rectal bleeding
  • Unexplained tiredness, weakness or weight loss
  • Abdominal pain, especially if severe
  • A lump or pain in the rectum or anus.

Not everyone who experiences these symptoms has bowel cancer. Other medical conditions, some foods and certain medicines can also cause these changes.

However, if you’re experiencing any of the above symptoms for more than two weeks, don’t delay in talking to your GP about them.

Family history

Most men who develop bowel cancer have no family history of the disease.

However, having a relative, especially a first-degree relative such as a parent, brother, sister or child with bowel cancer, can increase your risk of developing bowel cancer.

Diet and lifestyle

Choices you make related to diet, lifestyle, screening and surveillance can influence your bowel cancer risk.

Because you can change or modify these risk factors, they are referred to as ‘modifiable’. For the latest information on modifiable risk factors for bowel cancer, download this free resource.

Screening and surveillance

Bowel Cancer Australia recommends participating in screening appropriate to your personal level of risk. Discuss with your doctor what your personal risk is.

It’s Decembeard!

This December, grow a beard, raise funds and help beat bowel cancer in men. Visit Decembeard for more information or to donate.

Concerns?

Remember, if you experience any of the symptoms listed above, please make a booking with your doctor. It’s not worth the risk!

 

Source: Decembeard Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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How much do you know about cervical cancer?

Cervical cancer is the growth of abnormal cells in the lining of the cervix.

These abnormal cells can develop into tumours and in worst-case scenarios – spread throughout the body. The cervix is part of the female reproductive system and is the narrow lower portion (or ‘neck’) of the uterus.

How do you get cervical cancer?

The risk factors associated with cervical cancer are:

  • Infection with the Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Smoking
  • Weak immune system
  • Family history
  • Exposure to Diethylstilboestrol or DES (an oestrogen medication prescribed to pregnant women from the 1940s to the early 1970s)
  • Lack of regular cervical screening tests.

What is the Human papillomavirus (HPV)?

Nearly all cases of cervical cancer are caused by an infection with the HPV.

HPV is an extremely common group of viruses that can affect both males and females. In most people, HPV is harmless and has no symptoms, but in some people the virus may persist and lead to diseases of the genital area, including genital warts and cancers of the cervix, vagina, vulva and anus.

How can HPV cause cervical cancer?

After entering the body, HPV will behave in one of two ways: either remaining dormant (inside the body’s cells), or becoming active.

In most cases, the body’s immune system will clear the virus from the body naturally within 14 months. If the immune system does not clear a HPV infection, it can cause normal cells in the lining of the cervix to turn abnormal. In rare cases this can develop into cervical cancer.

Are there any symptoms of cervical cancer?

If early cell changes develop into cervical cancer, the most common symptoms that might be present are:

  • Vaginal bleeding between periods or after menopause
  • Pain during intercourse
  • Excessive tiredness
  • Lower back pain
  • Bleeding after intercourse
  • Unusual vaginal discharge
  • Leg pain or swelling.

These symptoms can also be caused by other more common conditions so please don’t panic if you do experience them.

However, see your GP at PVH Medical if you’re worried or if the symptoms are ongoing. If necessary, your GP will refer you for further tests.

In many cases cervical cancer does not usually carry any external symptoms until it is in advanced stages. That’s why the Cervical Screening Test is so important (see below).

How can you prevent cervical cancer?

There are two ways to prevent cervical cancer: vaccination and cervical screening.

The HPV vaccine protects against nine of the main HPV types that cause 90% of cervical cancer.

In December 2017, the five-yearly Cervical Screening Test (CST) replaced the two-yearly Pap test in Australia. For most women aged 25 to 74, your first CST is due two years after your last Pap test. After that, you will only need to have the test every five years if your result is normal.

Raising awareness for cervical cancer

National Cervical Cancer Awareness Week is being held from November 12-18.

To help raise awareness, women are being asked to get out their orange nail polish. If you don’t have any, you can buy some here. Proceeds will pay for the cervical screening of a woman in a developing country who otherwise would not have access to this life-saving test.

Make a booking today

We’re here for you until 9pm every weeknight and 5pm each Saturday. If you need to see us, please make a booking today.

 

Source: Australian Cervical Cancer Foundation, Australian Government Cancer Australia, National Cervical Screening Program and Understanding HPV

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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breast cancer Melbourne

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October, Australia’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month, provides an opportunity for us all to focus on breast cancer and its impact on those affected by the disease in our community.

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer is the abnormal growth of the cells lining the breast lobules or ducts. These cells grow uncontrollably and have the potential to spread to other parts of the body.

Both men and women can develop breast cancer, although it is uncommon in men.

It’s the most common cancer in women

Breast cancer remains the most common cancer among Australian women (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer).

Survival rates continue to improve in Australia with 89 out of every 100 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer now surviving five or more years beyond diagnosis.

Finding breast cancer early provides the best chance of surviving the disease. You don’t need to be an expert or use a special technique to check your breasts.

What to look for

Changes to look for include:

  • A new lump or lumpiness, especially if it’s only in one breast
  • A change in the size or shape of your breast
  • A change to the nipple, such as crusting, ulcer, redness or inversion
  • A nipple discharge that occurs without squeezing
  • A change in the skin of your breast such as redness or dimpling
  • An unusual pain that doesn’t go away.

Most changes aren’t due to breast cancer but it’s important to see your doctor without delay if you notice any of these changes.

View the short video below about the breast changes you need to look out for.

Breast cancer risk factors

It’s important to separate the fact from the fiction about risk factors for breast cancer. With an understanding of the things that may increase your chance of developing breast cancer, you can take positive steps to reduce your risk.

Find out more about your risk for breast cancer using this evidence-based breast cancer risk calculator.

Pink Ribbon Day

October is the official month for Cancer Council’s Pink Ribbon Day, though you can get involved at any time throughout the year.

You can help those affected by breast cancer by making a donation, hosting a Pink Ribbon event or even buying Pink Ribbon merchandise.

For more information or to show your support, visit Pink Ribbon.

Questions? Concerns? Ask us!

Our team of friendly GPs are here to help with any questions or concerns you may have about breast cancer.

We understand if your preference is to see a female doctor. We’d be pleased to help you in any way we can.

Please make a booking online or call us on 9304 0500 today.

 

Source: Australian Government Cancer Australia and Cancer Council Pink Ribbon

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Talk to your GP about prostate health

Prostate cancer. Get the facts.

Only men have a prostate. It is a small gland that sits below the bladder near the rectum.

The prostate is often described as being the size of a walnut and it is normal for it to grow as men age. Sometimes this can cause problems, such as difficulty urinating. These problems are common in older men and not always symptoms or signs of cancer.

Prostate cancer

Prostate cancer occurs when abnormal cells develop in the prostate. These abnormal cells can continue to multiply in an uncontrolled way and sometimes spread outside the prostate into nearby or distant parts of the body.

Three facts about prostate cancer

  1. In Australia, prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men
  2. More than 3,000 men die of prostate cancer in Australia every year
  3. More men die of prostate cancer than women die of breast cancer.

What are some symptoms of prostate cancer?

In the early stages, there may be no symptoms. In the later stages, some symptoms of prostate cancer might include:

  • Feeling the frequent or sudden need to urinate
  • Finding it difficult to urinate (for example, trouble starting or not being able to urinate when the feeling is there or poor urine flow)
  • Discomfort when urinating
  • Finding blood in urine or semen
  • Pain in the lower back, upper thighs or hips.

These symptoms may not mean you have prostate cancer, but if you do experience any of them, please see your doctor at PVH Medical.

What are the risk factors?

Factors that are most strongly linked to an increased chance of developing prostate cancer are:

  • Age – the chance of developing prostate cancer increases as you grow older
  • Family history – you have a higher chance of developing prostate cancer if you have a first degree male relative with this cancer.

Other factors that may increase the risk of developing prostate cancer include genetics, diet and lifestyle.

Reducing the risk of developing prostate cancer

There is no evidence that the following protective factors can stop prostate cancer from developing, but they can improve your overall health and possibly reduce the risk of prostate cancer:

  • Diet – eat meals that are nutritious. What is good for the heart is good for the prostate.
  • Physical activity/exercise – there is some evidence to show that physical activity and regular exercise can be protective factors for cancer. Try to exercise for at least 30 minutes a day.

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia is asking Australia to get involved and help create awareness and raise the much-needed funds to help in the fight against prostate cancer.

If you’re male and over 50 – or over 40 if you have a family history – you’re encouraged to talk with your GP about prostate health.

Make an online booking with your friendly doctor in Pascoe Vale or call 9304 0500 today.

 

Source: Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Bowel cancer awareness

What are the symptoms of bowel cancer?

Bowel cancer, also known as colorectal cancer or colon cancer, is cancer in any part of the colon or rectum. Bowel cancer is Australia’s second biggest cancer killer.

Common symptoms of bowel cancer can include:

  • A recent, persistent change in bowel habit
  • A change in shape or appearance of bowel movements
  • Blood in the stool or rectal bleeding
  • Frequent gas pain, cramps
  • A feeling that the bowel has not emptied completely after a bowel movement
  • Unexplained anaemia or low iron levels
  • Rectal/anal pain or a lump in the rectum/anus
  • Abdominal pain or swelling.

Not everyone experiences symptoms, particularly in the early stages of bowel cancer. The above symptoms may be suggestive of bowel cancer, but they can also be due to other medical conditions, some foods or medicines.

Don’t delay in talking to your GP at PVH Medical if you are experiencing any of the described symptoms for two weeks or more. When diagnosed early 90% of cases can be successfully treated.

In particular, blood in the stool or rectal bleeding should never be ignored.

Celebrating Bowel Cancer Awareness Month

Bowel Cancer Awareness Month is an annual initiative of Bowel Cancer Australia running throughout the month of June. It aims to raise public awareness of a disease that claims the lives of 80 Australians every week.

A highlight of Bowel Cancer Awareness Month is Red Apple Day (Wednesday, 20 June 2018), where Australians are encouraged to support the vital work of Bowel Cancer Australia through the purchase of a Bowel Cancer Awareness Ribbon (incorporating the apple pin) and apple-themed fundraising activities.

You can also help fight this disease by spreading the word or making a donation.

There is also a free bowel cancer app that you can download from your app store. It provides easy access to accurate information about bowel cancer, its prevention, diagnosis and management.

Got questions or concerns? We can help

If you have any questions about bowel cancer, or any symptoms, we can help. The sooner you see us the better.

Make a booking today with one of our friendly doctors. You can book online, on Facebook, on the Appointuit app or by calling 9304 0500.

 

Source: Bowel Cancer Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Get your skin checked by a doctor in Pascoe Vale.

It’s ‘Melanoma March’

Melanoma March is an annual awareness and fundraising initiative that funds life-changing melanoma research.

In 2018, there are 20 Melanoma March events taking place across the country. Some participate to remember a loved one whilst others are on their own melanoma journey. All come along in support of finding a cure for melanoma.

What is melanoma?

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer which usually occurs on the parts of the body that have been overexposed to the sun. Rare melanomas can occur in parts of the skin or body that have never been exposed to the sun.

Melanoma is the fourth most common cancer diagnosed in Australia, which along with New Zealand has the world’s highest incidence rate for melanoma.

Melanoma is more commonly diagnosed in men than women. The risk of being diagnosed with melanoma by age 85 is 1 in 13 for men compared to 1 in 22 for women.

This year, more than 14,000 Australians will be diagnosed with melanoma. Sadly, around 1,800 will die from the disease.

Melanoma symptoms

Often melanoma has no symptoms. However, the first sign is generally a change in an existing mole or the appearance of a new spot. These changes can include:

  • Colour – a mole may change in colour or have different colour shades or become blotchy
  • Size – a mole may appear to get bigger
  • Shape – a mole may have an irregular border or may increase in height
  • Elevation – the mole may develop a raised area
  • Itching or bleeding.

Other symptoms include dark areas under nails or on membranes lining the mouth, vagina or anus.

New moles and spots will appear and change during childhood, adolescence and during pregnancy and this is normal. However, adults who develop new spots or moles should have them examined by their doctor.

Shannan’s story

Shannan Ponton, from television program The Biggest Loser, thought he was invincible. He wasn’t. But his melanoma battle ended up saving more than his own life.

His melanoma story began on a beach in Bali when his wife spotted a suspicious looking mole on the back of his thigh. She booked him in for a skin check immediately on his return to Sydney. It was melanoma.

Despite undergoing two rounds of surgery and now sporting a 20cm scar, his melanoma hadn’t spread. He was so rattled by his melanoma diagnosis that he immediately called an ‘intervention’ with his mates, inviting 15 of them around to his house for a BBQ.

“I said boys, we all lead a similar lifestyle. I’ve just been diagnosed with melanoma. I want all of you to go and get a skin check,” Shannan recalls.

All 15 mates at Shannan’s intervention that afternoon booked themselves in for skins checks – 2 were subsequently diagnosed with melanoma.

“If it wasn’t for that intervention and that feeling in my gut to go beyond trying to just help, and actually making a difference, those two guys could not be here now,” Shannan added.

Watch Shannan’s story below.

 

Visit the Melanoma March website for more melanoma stories, events and to donate.

Get your skin checked at PVH Medical

If you’ve noticed a change in an existing mole or the appearance of a new spot, or you just want a general skin check for your peace of mind, make a booking with a doctor today.

Having a regular skin check could save your life!

 

Source: Melanoma Institute Australia and Cancer Council Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Find out about your risk of ovarian cancer at PVH Medical in Pascoe Vale.

Ovarian cancer – are you at risk?

Ovarian cancer is the deadliest women’s cancer.

Unfortunately, this has not changed in 30 years. Every day in Australia, four women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and three will die from the disease.

February is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. It’s held each year in Australia to raise awareness of the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer, to share the stories of real women affected by the disease, to highlight the risk factors for ovarian cancer and educate Australians on ovarian cancer diagnosis and treatment.

What are some of the risks of ovarian cancer?

We don’t know the causes of most ovarian cancer. Research into the causes of ovarian cancer is continuing in Australia and overseas.

We do know that there are some factors that may increase a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer and that there are some protective factors that may reduce a woman’s risk.

It’s important to know that many women who develop ovarian cancer do not have any known risk factors — while many women who do have risk factors never develop ovarian cancer.

Here are some of the risk factors:

  • Age: ovarian cancer is most common in women over 50 and in women who have stopped menstruating (have been through menopause), and the risk increases with age. However, ovarian cancer can affect women of all ages.
  • Genetics and family history: if a woman has two or more relatives from the same side of her family affected by ovarian, or ovarian and breast cancer her risk of developing ovarian cancer may be increased. Genetics and family history are responsible for at least 15% of ovarian cancers.
  • Child-bearing history: women who have not had children, are unable to have children, have never used oral contraceptives or have had children over the age of 30, may be slightly more at risk. This is due to ovaries not having a ‘rest’ from the break and repair of the surface of the ovary when women ovulate each month.
  • Endometriosis: this condition is when the tissue lining the uterus (endometrium) is also found outside of the uterus.
  • Lifestyle factors: such as smoking tobacco, being overweight or eating a high-fat diet.
  • Hormonal factors: including early puberty (menstruating before 12) or late menopause (onset after 50).

Take action during Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

In 2018, Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month is about making a stand – it’s time for action. You can help the cause and take action by doing the following:

Make a booking today

To see if you’re at risk of ovarian cancer, or just for a general check-up, please make a booking today. You can book online, on Facebook, on the Appointuit app or by calling 9304 0500.

 

Source: Ovarian Cancer Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Our doctors in Pascoe Vale can answer any questions you have about skin cancer.

Be SunSmart this summer

Skin cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in Australia.

Over 434,000 people are treated for one or more non-melanoma cancers in Australia each year and over 11,500 people are treated for melanoma cancers.

In 2011, there were more than 2,000 deaths from melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. Australia has the highest rate of skin cancer in the world.

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun is our main source of Vitamin D, but it is also the major cause of skin cancer. Skin can burn in just 15 minutes in the summer sun.

Skin cancer is largely preventable

Be SunSmart. When the UV level is 3 or above, protect yourself against sun damage and skin cancer by following these steps:

Our doctors in Pascoe Vale can answer any questions you have about skin cancer.

1. Slip on clothing

Cover as much skin as possible, such as shirts with long sleeves and high necks/collars. Wear clothing made from close-weave materials such as cotton, polyester/cotton and linen.

When swimming, wear material such as lycra which stays sun-protective when wet.

2. Slop on sunscreen

Sunscreen is only effective if you apply enough to your body, including your face, 30 minutes before heading outdoors. Reapply every two hours outside, and immediately after swimming, towel-drying, or heavy sweating.

It’s best to use a broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) water-based sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher every day.

3. Slap on a hat

A broad-brimmed, legionnaire or bucket-style hat provides good protection for the face, nose, neck and ears, which are common sites for skin cancers. Caps and visors do not provide enough protection.

Choose a hat made with closely woven fabric – if you can see through it, UV radiation will get through. Hats may not protect you from reflected UV radiation, so also wear sunglasses and sunscreen.

4. Seek shade

Be UV cautious in the middle of the day when UV levels are most intense. Shade provides good sun protection, but remember that UV rays reflect off surfaces such as sand, water and paving, so use other sun protection measures when in the shade too.

5.  Slide on sunglasses

Sunglasses and a broad-brimmed hat worn together can reduce UV radiation exposure to the eyes by up to 98%. Sunglasses should be worn outside during daylight hours.

Choose close-fitting, wrap-around sunglasses that meet the Australian Standard AS 1067. Sunglasses are as important for children as they are for adults.

Finally…

Check your skin regularly and see your doctor if you notice any unusual skin changes. If you have a lesion that doesn’t heal, or a mole that has suddenly appeared, changed in size, thickness, shape, colour or has started to bleed, see your doctor immediately.

Treatment is more likely to be successful if skin cancer is discovered early. Remember, if you have any concerns or questions, please make an appointment with one of our friendly doctors.

 

Source: Cancer Council Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Get your cervical screening test at PVH Medical in Pascoe Vale.

Cervical screening test – starting 1 December

There are some important changes regarding the Pap test.

The two-yearly Pap test for women aged 18 to 69 will change to a five-yearly cervical screening test (CST) for women aged 25 to 74.

The latest medical and scientific evidence shows that having a cervical screening test every five years is just as safe, and is more effective than having a Pap test every two years.

Changes to age brackets

The age at which screening starts will increase from 18 to 25. If you are aged between 25 and 74 and have ever been sexually active, you should have a cervical screening test every five years until you’re 74.

Getting tested

You will be due for your first cervical screening test two years after your last Pap test. We’ll send you a reminder letter so you don’t forget to get tested.

Your doctor will receive your results about two weeks after your test.

If you’ve been vaccinated against the human papillomavirus (Gardasil vaccine) it is still recommended to have ongoing cervical screening tests as this vaccine does not protect against all the types of HPV that cause cervical cancer.

Any symptoms? See a doctor

Women of any age who have symptoms such as unusual bleeding, discharge and pain should see their doctor immediately.

If you have any questions about cervical cancer or the new cervical screening test, please make an appointment with us.

See the frequently asked questions about the cervical screening test.

 

Source: Department of Health – National Cervical Screening Program

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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See a doctor in Pascoe Vale if you're at risk of getting lung cancer.

Lung cancer: the facts

Lung cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the lung grow in an uncontrolled way. It often spreads (metastasises) to other parts of the body before the cancer can be detected in the lungs.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of death in Australia with around 12,000 people diagnosed each year. It’s 1 of the 10 most common cancers in both men and women in Australia.

The signs and symptoms of lung cancer can include:

  • a new cough that has persisted for three weeks or more
  • a changed cough
  • coughing up blood
  • a chest infection that won’t go away
  • chest pain and/or shoulder pain
  • shortness of breath
  • hoarse voice
  • weight loss or loss of appetite.

The symptoms of lung cancer can often be vague and mimic those of other conditions, so it’s important to know what your cough is telling you.

What are the risk factors for lung cancer?

Factors that are associated with a higher risk of developing lung cancer include:

  • smoking cigarettes, pipes or cigars currently or in the past – this is the greatest risk factor for lung cancer, and the risk is greatest for people who began smoking early in life, smoked for longer and smoked more often
  • exposure to second-hand smoke
  • personal or family history of lung cancer
  • radiotherapy treatment to the chest
  • exposure to radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas that can build up inside houses in some areas
  • exposure to asbestos fibres – this also increases the risk of developing mesothelioma, which starts in the lining surrounding the lungs (the pleura) and is not considered a type of lung cancer
  • exposure to other workplace substances, including radioactive ores (e.g. uranium), chromium compounds, nickel, arsenic, soot, tar or diesel fumes
  • exposure to air pollution
  • infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS
  • a history of certain diseases of the lungs, including tuberculosis, fungal infections of the lungs, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis.

Some risk factors are modifiable, such as lifestyle or environmental risk factors, and others cannot be modified, such as inherited factors and whether someone in the family has had cancer.

Having one or more risk factors does not mean that you will develop cancer. Many people have at least one risk factor but will never develop cancer, while others with cancer may have had no known risk factors. Even if a person with cancer has a risk factor, it is usually hard to know how much that risk factor contributed to the development of their disease.

Lung Cancer Awareness Month

November, Lung Cancer Awareness Month, provides the opportunity to raise community awareness of lung cancer and the signs and symptoms of the disease.

Cancer Australia has released a lung cancer awareness video called ‘What’s your cough telling you?’. It highlights symptoms that could be lung cancer and the importance of early assessment by a GP or healthcare worker.

Make a booking today

Are you at risk of getting lung cancer? See your doctor to be sure. Finding lung cancer at an early stage can lead to better outcomes.

Make a booking today with one of our friendly doctors. You can book online, on the Appointuit app or by calling 9304 0500.

 

Source: Cancer Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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PVH Medical supports Movember.

Movember is for men’s health

The Movember Foundation is the only global charity focused solely on men’s health.

Since 2003, $850 million has been raised and countless men and women have been empowered to join the global men’s health movement. Through the moustaches grown, the connections created, and the conversations generated, more than 1,200 breakthrough men’s health projects have been funded in 21 countries.

A bit about the history of Movember

The seed of an idea first sprouted over a few beers in Melbourne in 2003, when two mates challenged each other to grow a moustache for the duration of November. Recruiting the support of 30 loyal friends, together they experienced a month of inquisitive conversation as a result of their newly acquired facial hair. The power of the Mo as a conversation starter and awareness raiser was realised.

What it’s all about

Movember is about helping men live happier, healthier, longer lives through investing in these key areas: prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention.

Funds raised go towards supporting innovative world-class men’s health programs supporting the key areas.

Getting involved is easy. Simply sign up at Movember.com and fundraise by growing a moustache, setting a movement challenge (like walking, running or swimming), hosting an event or making a donation.

Startling statistics about men’s health

Across the world, men die an average six years younger than women, and for reasons that are largely preventable. The stats are startling:

  • 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime
  • 1 in 2 men will be diagnosed with cancer
  • Testicular cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men ages 15-29
  • 3 out of 4 suicides are men
  • More than 500,000 men take their own life every year. That’s one every minute.

“When we look at these stats, it becomes so clear that there is a men’s health crisis,” says Owen Sharp, CEO of Movember Foundation.

“There is a lot that needs to be done, but by talking about it, by encouraging our friends to take action for their health and supporting them, we can help keep the men we love around to live happier, healthier, longer lives. They don’t have to miss out on those key moments that matter most.”

Men’s health matters

At PVH Medical, our men’s health services aim to provide professional treatment of all types of men’s health problems in a confidential setting. From routine check-ups to screening tests to treating chronic ailments, our doctors have the experience and expertise to ensure optimal health and wellness.

So if you or a loved one needs to see a doctor, we’re here for you. You can make a booking online, on the Appointuit mobile app or by giving us a call on 9304 0500.

 

Source: Movember

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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If you find a suspicious breast change, make a booking to see a doctor at PVH Medical Pascoe Vale.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

This October is an opportunity for Australians to focus on breast cancer and its impact on those affected.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Australian women. According to the Department of Human Services, over 17,000 women are likely to be diagnosed with this cancer in 2017.

Detecting breast cancer

Early detection of breast cancer can saves lives.

Detecting any abnormalities early on ensures that women have all treatment options available to them. The earlier breast cancer is found, the better the chance of surviving it.

In Australia, free routine mammographic screening is available through BreastScreen Australia services in each state for women aged 50 to 74.

Women aged 40 to 49 can also have mammography, but breast screening is less effective because the density (thickness) of breast tissue makes it more difficult to see a cancer in the x-ray and fewer women are diagnosed in this age group.

This free service is not offered to women under the age of 40. This is because research suggests that younger women do not benefit from routine mammographic screening because they have denser breast tissue than older women. It is also not offered to men due to their lack of breast tissue.

All women are encouraged to be ‘breast aware’ – that is, familiar with the normal look and feel of their breasts.

If you find a suspicious breast change, make a booking with us immediately. Our friendly team of GPs can refer you to imaging tests to confirm the presence of the change.

If the imaging results appear suspicious, you will be referred for a biopsy for confirmation and diagnosis.

Breast cancer in Australia: the facts

  • One in eight women will develop breast cancer in their lifetime.
  • On average, eight women die from breast cancer every day.
  • There are more than 65,000 people currently living with breast cancer in Australia.
  • This year, 17,586 women (an average of 48 every day) are projected to be diagnosed with breast cancer, although mortality is predicted to continuously decline.
  • Women diagnosed with breast cancer have a 90% chance of surviving five years after diagnosis.
  • Increasing age is one of the strongest risk factors for developing breast cancer.
  • More than two in three cases of breast cancer occur in women aged between 40 and 69 years.
  • Breast cancer spreading to other organs (metastasis) is the main cause of death from breast cancer. The survival rate of women that have metastatic breast cancer at first diagnosis is alarmingly low, with only one in four women still alive five years after diagnosis.
  • Improvements in survival are attributed to earlier detection of breast cancer through regular mammograms and improved treatment outcomes for breast cancer.
  • Although rare, breast cancer can also affect men, accounting for about 1% of cases.

Donate now to help save lives

Research is the only way to end breast cancer.

The National Breast Cancer Foundation, which does not receive government funding, is calling on all Australians for a donation.

It’s one way you can help the Foundation take a step closer to achieving its goal of zero deaths from breast cancer by 2030.

Remember, we are here to help. If you have any questions about breast cancer, please ask one of our GPs.

 

Source: National Breast Cancer Foundation.

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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