All Posts Tagged: bowel

Bowel cancer Melbourne

Fighting bowel cancer

Bowel cancer is diagnosed in about 3,700 Victorians and over 12,500 Australians every year.

Also called colorectal cancer, this serious disease mostly affects people aged 50 and over. However, it can happen in younger people too.

Bowel cancer is the third deadliest cancer in men.

The good news is that if bowel cancer or its warning signs (polyps) are diagnosed early, it is often curable.

Symptoms of bowel cancer

In the early stages, bowel cancer often has no symptoms. This means that a person could have polyps or bowel cancer and not know it.

Some of the most common symptoms of bowel cancer are:

  • Blood or mucus in faeces or on toilet paper
  • An unexpected change in bowel habit (e.g. diarrhoea or constipation for no obvious reason)
  • general discomfort in the abdomen (feelings of bloating, fullness, pain, cramps)
  • constant tiredness
  • weakness and paleness.

Having these symptoms doesn’t mean that you have bowel cancer. If you’re experiencing these symptoms you should discuss them with your doctor at PVH Medical.

Screening for bowel cancer

90% of bowel cancers can be successfully treated. That is why screening is so important.

Bowel cancer screening is looking for early changes in the bowel lining, or signs of a bowel cancer in healthy people who do not have symptoms.

Screening can find polyps so they can be removed before they turn into cancer. It’s one of the most effective ways to prevent bowel cancer developing.

A simple home test could save your life

If you’re aged between 50 and 74, you’ll receive a free home testing kit from the government. Do the test – it could save your life.

If you don’t receive a kit, check this online calculator or call the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program Information Line on 1800 118 868 to see when you will.

The Cancer Council recommends doing a screening test every two years to protect yourself against bowel cancer.

Talk to us about bowel cancer

If you’re over 50 you should talk to us about the screening tests, so that any signs of bowel cancer can be picked up early.

We have both female and male doctors in Pascoe Vale to help you with any questions you may have.

Together let’s fight bowel cancer!

 

Source: BetterHealth Channel and Cancer Council

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Bowel cancer awareness

What are the symptoms of bowel cancer?

Bowel cancer, also known as colorectal cancer or colon cancer, is cancer in any part of the colon or rectum. Bowel cancer is Australia’s second biggest cancer killer.

Common symptoms of bowel cancer can include:

  • A recent, persistent change in bowel habit
  • A change in shape or appearance of bowel movements
  • Blood in the stool or rectal bleeding
  • Frequent gas pain, cramps
  • A feeling that the bowel has not emptied completely after a bowel movement
  • Unexplained anaemia or low iron levels
  • Rectal/anal pain or a lump in the rectum/anus
  • Abdominal pain or swelling.

Not everyone experiences symptoms, particularly in the early stages of bowel cancer. The above symptoms may be suggestive of bowel cancer, but they can also be due to other medical conditions, some foods or medicines.

Don’t delay in talking to your GP at PVH Medical if you are experiencing any of the described symptoms for two weeks or more. When diagnosed early 90% of cases can be successfully treated.

In particular, blood in the stool or rectal bleeding should never be ignored.

Celebrating Bowel Cancer Awareness Month

Bowel Cancer Awareness Month is an annual initiative of Bowel Cancer Australia running throughout the month of June. It aims to raise public awareness of a disease that claims the lives of 80 Australians every week.

A highlight of Bowel Cancer Awareness Month is Red Apple Day (Wednesday, 20 June 2018), where Australians are encouraged to support the vital work of Bowel Cancer Australia through the purchase of a Bowel Cancer Awareness Ribbon (incorporating the apple pin) and apple-themed fundraising activities.

You can also help fight this disease by spreading the word or making a donation.

There is also a free bowel cancer app that you can download from your app store. It provides easy access to accurate information about bowel cancer, its prevention, diagnosis and management.

Got questions or concerns? We can help

If you have any questions about bowel cancer, or any symptoms, we can help. The sooner you see us the better.

Make a booking today with one of our friendly doctors. You can book online, on Facebook, on the Appointuit app or by calling 9304 0500.

 

Source: Bowel Cancer Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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See a doctor in Pascoe Vale if you think you have IBD

Understanding Crohn’s and colitis

Crohn’s Disease and ulcerative colitis are lifelong gastrointestinal disorders that commonly present themselves in children, adolescents and adults.

Collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the conditions are an emerging global disease, with Australia having one of the highest prevalence in the world. More than 80,000 Australians live with these conditions, with numbers expected to increase to more than 100,000 by 2022.

What are the symptoms?

Typical symptoms include the frequent and urgent need to use the toilet, diarrhoea, loss of appetite, fatigue and weight loss. This can often result in depression, anxiety and isolation in sufferers.

The conditions are becoming more prevalent, more severe and more complex and are being diagnosed in more and more young patients.

What causes it?

No one knows for certain yet what causes IBD but it is believed to be a combination of genetic, environmental and immunological factors.

Exposure to environmental triggers – possibly viruses, bacteria and/or proteins – prompts the immune system to switch on its normal defence mechanism (inflammation) against a foreign substance.

Prolonged inflammation eventually damages the walls of the gastrointestinal tract and causes the symptoms of IBD.

What treatment is available?

IBD cannot be cured as yet but it can be managed effectively, especially with the use of medications and specialist care to control the abnormal inflammatory response, aiming to help reduce the frequency of flare-ups and maintain remission.

Raising awareness for Crohn’s and colitis

May is Crohn’s and colitis awareness month. It’s an annual campaign held in Australia to raise awareness about the impact of living with Crohn’s Disease and ulcerative colitis.

Throughout May, Crohn’s & Colitis Australia (CCA) will help raise awareness of IBD, encouraging Australians diagnosed with IBD to join a conversation about the challenges of this invisible disease.

Go purple on World IBD Day

Saturday May 19 is World IBD Day, a day dedicated for raising awareness for inflammatory bowel disease across the world.

You can show your support for those living with IBD on this special day. All you have to do is wear something purple – it could be a wig or simply a purple ribbon. It’s all about starting the conversation about Crohn’s and colitis, and having fun while you do it.

Are you suffering from IBD?

If you have any concerns, our team of doctors can help you. Don’t suffer in silence – make an appointment today. You can book online, on Facebook, on the Appointuit app or by calling 9304 0500.

 

Source: CCA

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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