All Posts Tagged: bowel cancer

Bowel cancer Melbourne

Fighting bowel cancer

Bowel cancer is diagnosed in about 3,700 Victorians and over 12,500 Australians every year.

Also called colorectal cancer, this serious disease mostly affects people aged 50 and over. However, it can happen in younger people too.

Bowel cancer is the third deadliest cancer in men.

The good news is that if bowel cancer or its warning signs (polyps) are diagnosed early, it is often curable.

Symptoms of bowel cancer

In the early stages, bowel cancer often has no symptoms. This means that a person could have polyps or bowel cancer and not know it.

Some of the most common symptoms of bowel cancer are:

  • Blood or mucus in faeces or on toilet paper
  • An unexpected change in bowel habit (e.g. diarrhoea or constipation for no obvious reason)
  • general discomfort in the abdomen (feelings of bloating, fullness, pain, cramps)
  • constant tiredness
  • weakness and paleness.

Having these symptoms doesn’t mean that you have bowel cancer. If you’re experiencing these symptoms you should discuss them with your doctor at PVH Medical.

Screening for bowel cancer

90% of bowel cancers can be successfully treated. That is why screening is so important.

Bowel cancer screening is looking for early changes in the bowel lining, or signs of a bowel cancer in healthy people who do not have symptoms.

Screening can find polyps so they can be removed before they turn into cancer. It’s one of the most effective ways to prevent bowel cancer developing.

A simple home test could save your life

If you’re aged between 50 and 74, you’ll receive a free home testing kit from the government. Do the test – it could save your life.

If you don’t receive a kit, check this online calculator or call the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program Information Line on 1800 118 868 to see when you will.

The Cancer Council recommends doing a screening test every two years to protect yourself against bowel cancer.

Talk to us about bowel cancer

If you’re over 50 you should talk to us about the screening tests, so that any signs of bowel cancer can be picked up early.

We have both female and male doctors in Pascoe Vale to help you with any questions you may have.

Together let’s fight bowel cancer!

 

Source: BetterHealth Channel and Cancer Council

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Bowel cancer Melbourne

Bowel cancer in men

1 in 11 Australian men will develop bowel cancer in their lifetime.

Bowel cancer affects men of all ages and the risk increases every year from age 50. Around 55% of all Australians diagnosed with bowel cancer are men.

The impact of bowel cancer in men

Bowel cancer is the third deadliest cancer in men. It kills more than 2,300 men each year.

More than 8,000 Australian men are diagnosed with the disease each year. Around 15% of those men diagnosed with bowel cancer are under age 55.

Preventing bowel cancer in men

Symptoms

In its early stages bowel cancer often has no obvious symptoms. However, any of the following may be suggestive of bowel cancer:

  • Persistent change in bowel habit (looser more diarrhoea-like bowel movements, constipation, or smaller more frequent bowel movements)
  • Change in appearance of bowel movements
  • Blood in the bowel movement or rectal bleeding
  • Unexplained tiredness, weakness or weight loss
  • Abdominal pain, especially if severe
  • A lump or pain in the rectum or anus.

Not everyone who experiences these symptoms has bowel cancer. Other medical conditions, some foods and certain medicines can also cause these changes.

However, if you’re experiencing any of the above symptoms for more than two weeks, don’t delay in talking to your GP about them.

Family history

Most men who develop bowel cancer have no family history of the disease.

However, having a relative, especially a first-degree relative such as a parent, brother, sister or child with bowel cancer, can increase your risk of developing bowel cancer.

Diet and lifestyle

Choices you make related to diet, lifestyle, screening and surveillance can influence your bowel cancer risk.

Because you can change or modify these risk factors, they are referred to as ‘modifiable’. For the latest information on modifiable risk factors for bowel cancer, download this free resource.

Screening and surveillance

Bowel Cancer Australia recommends participating in screening appropriate to your personal level of risk. Discuss with your doctor what your personal risk is.

Concerns?

Remember, if you experience any of the symptoms listed above, please make a booking with your doctor. It’s not worth the risk!

 

Source: Decembeard Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Bowel cancer awareness

What are the symptoms of bowel cancer?

Bowel cancer, also known as colorectal cancer or colon cancer, is cancer in any part of the colon or rectum. Bowel cancer is Australia’s second biggest cancer killer.

Common symptoms of bowel cancer can include:

  • A recent, persistent change in bowel habit
  • A change in shape or appearance of bowel movements
  • Blood in the stool or rectal bleeding
  • Frequent gas pain, cramps
  • A feeling that the bowel has not emptied completely after a bowel movement
  • Unexplained anaemia or low iron levels
  • Rectal/anal pain or a lump in the rectum/anus
  • Abdominal pain or swelling.

Not everyone experiences symptoms, particularly in the early stages of bowel cancer. The above symptoms may be suggestive of bowel cancer, but they can also be due to other medical conditions, some foods or medicines.

Don’t delay in talking to your GP at PVH Medical if you are experiencing any of the described symptoms for two weeks or more. When diagnosed early 90% of cases can be successfully treated.

In particular, blood in the stool or rectal bleeding should never be ignored.

Celebrating Bowel Cancer Awareness Month

Bowel Cancer Awareness Month is an annual initiative of Bowel Cancer Australia running throughout the month of June. It aims to raise public awareness of a disease that claims the lives of 80 Australians every week.

A highlight of Bowel Cancer Awareness Month is Red Apple Day (Wednesday, 20 June 2018), where Australians are encouraged to support the vital work of Bowel Cancer Australia through the purchase of a Bowel Cancer Awareness Ribbon (incorporating the apple pin) and apple-themed fundraising activities.

You can also help fight this disease by spreading the word or making a donation.

There is also a free bowel cancer app that you can download from your app store. It provides easy access to accurate information about bowel cancer, its prevention, diagnosis and management.

Got questions or concerns? We can help

If you have any questions about bowel cancer, or any symptoms, we can help. The sooner you see us the better.

Make a booking today with one of our friendly doctors. You can book online, on Facebook, on the Appointuit app or by calling 9304 0500.

 

Source: Bowel Cancer Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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