All Posts Tagged: alcohol

Healthy showdown

Healthy showdown – which food or drink is healthier?

Do you ever get confused about which is the healthier option when buying everyday food and drink products?

Our in-house dietitian, Jessica Fuller, reveals which of the following options you should choose.

Welcome to the healthy showdown!

Cos lettuce vs iceberg lettuce

Whilst cos lettuce does contain slightly more calories per 100g, it also has 11 times the amount of Vitamin A and three times the amount of folate and Vitamin K!

Both cos and iceberg lettuce will provide a refreshing crunch to your meals. However, simply swapping iceberg to cos lettuce can be an easy way to up your vitamin intake.

Winner: Cos lettuce

Iced tea vs hot tea

A pot of hot tea contains plenty of antioxidants which can provide several health benefits. The typical store-bought iced tea, per 250mL glass, has 22g of sugar which equals 5½ teaspoons!

Would you really add 5 teaspoons of sugar to your regular hot tea?! Probably not. Next time you feel like an iced tea, brew a regular hot tea and fill the glass with ice and 1 tsp of honey.

You now have a healthy iced tea with only 5g of sugar! Plus, your homemade brew of iced tea will have the same antioxidants, catechins and flavonoids as hot tea.

Winner: Hot tea

Tuna vs salmon

Both tuna and salmon are considered a source of oily fish and therefore contain Omega 3 fatty acids. This is essential for helping to prevent heart disease and stroke and may also play protective roles in cancer and other conditions.

Tuna has less calories, less fat and a similar protein content than salmon in a 100g serve. However, calories aren’t the only thing that matters in health.

Salmon has eight times more Omega 3 than tuna and is considered a ‘super source’ of Omega 3.

Both tuna and salmon can be included as part of a balanced diet but in terms of the Omega 3 content and health benefits that come along with Omega 3 intake, salmon is the winner.

Winner: Salmon

Apple vs orange

Fruit in general is a great go-to snack that is full of fibre, micronutrients and low calories.

Apples and oranges are just two examples. But is one better than the other?

Oranges have 12 times the amount of Vitamin C than apples, which is necessary for the growth, development and repair of body tissues.

It’s also involved in many body functions, including formation of collagen, absorption of iron, the immune system, wound healing, and the maintenance of cartilage, bones, and teeth.

Both are similar in calories and contain similar amounts of sugar and fibre.

Winner: Draw (unless you need more vitamin C, in which case orange is the winner)

Egg vs chicken

Eggs and chicken are both high quality animal protein sources. Protein is essential for muscle growth, recovery, and keeping you fuller for longer.

Chicken has less calories per 100g and twice the amount of protein of eggs! However, eggs contain many other important nutrients along with protein including higher amounts of essential Omega 3 and 6 fats than chicken which are beneficial for cognitive function and brain development.

Eggs also contain small amounts of nearly all vitamins and minerals! Depending on your nutrition goals, either option is great. A good variety of both is recommended.

Winner: Draw

Beer vs wine

The alcohol content of wine is typically higher than beer. Therefore, a standard drink of wine is considered around 100ml and a standard drink of mid-strength beer is considered around 375ml.

A typical restaurant sized glass of white wine is 150ml which has 121 calories, which is twice as many compared to 150ml of beer.

However, beer is generally served in 425ml glasses, which contains 182 calories.

Red wine in particular also contains resveratrol, an antioxidant that may have heart health benefits. However, there is also increasing evidence that any alcohol consumed can have a negative impact on health!

Winner: Wine

How did you go?

Did you pick a winner? We hope so!

If you have any questions or need help with your diet, make a booking today with your friendly Pascoe Vale dietitian, Jessica Fuller.

You’d be amazed at the kinds of things a dietitian can help with.

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Travel health tip - wash your hands

8 helpful travel health tips (how to stay safe overseas)

You’ve probably heard about the coronavirus by now.

Originating in China, it’s a new virus that can cause respiratory illness, including pneumonia.

There are thousands of confirmed coronavirus cases around the world, including Australia, and some people have even died (you can get the latest coronavirus updates here).

While our travel health checklist has tips to help you before you go overseas, we thought it was timely to provide advice on how to stay safe once you’ve actually arrived at your destination.

1. Keep your hands clean

Proper handwashing can protect you and others from a range of diseases.

Make sure you wash your hands regularly with soap and water, especially before eating, when handling food and after you use the toilet.

You could also carry hand sanitiser with you as a back-up, to help keep the germs at bay.

2. Avoid sick people

This might seem obvious, but keep your distance from sick people.

And, keep your immune system strong by drinking lots of water, eating a balanced diet and sleeping well.

3. Think before you eat and drink

Getting gastro overseas is common. But you can try to minimise the dreaded ‘traveller’s diarrhoea’!

While a glass of soft drink might be safe, the ice in the glass could be made with contaminated water.

High-risk foods include raw meat and seafood, salads and unpasteurised dairy products.

4. Don’t get too drunk

The alcohol content of drinks varies between countries. So, a vodka soda in Europe could be twice as strong as what you drink here.

When you’re drunk, you might drop your guard and become an easy target for petty criminals, or worse. It’s not worth the risk.

(As an aside – if you need help with a drinking problem please contact us.)

5. Avoid wild and feral animals

The coronavirus is believed to have started in an animal market in central China.

So, when you’re overseas, avoid areas such as farms, live animal markets, and areas where animals are slaughtered, including fish and seafood.

If you do come into contact with animals or animal products, avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth until you have thoroughly cleaned your hands.

Some overseas destinations, like Bali and Thailand, are known for their street dogs and wild monkeys. Many of these animals have rabies, and if you’re bitten, it could be fatal.

Luckily, you can get immunised for rabies before you go. And remember to stay abreast with Smartraveller updates too!

6. Protect yourself from insects

Similar to wild animals, our insect friends can wreak havoc on our health if we’re not careful.

In many parts of the world, the bite of infected mosquitoes can spread infectious diseases including yellow fever, malaria and dengue fever.

Travel health tip: protect yourself by wearing mosquito repellent, and have a chat with us about vaccinations or medications you can take.

7. Protect yourself against the sun

We know how hot it can get in Australia. But the sun can also hit you in many countries overseas!

Apply sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher every day, and reapply when necessary. There are other ways you can protect your skin from the sun too.

8. Have safe sex

Condoms are not just for stopping pregnancy – they’re to help protect you from sexually transmissible infections (STIs) such as chlamydia, herpes, hepatitis B and HIV/AIDS.

The rate of STIs in some countries is very high. So, if you’re sexually active, carry condoms with you.

When you return

Pay close attention to your health in the fortnight after you get back from overseas. If you’re feeling unwell you should see your doctor.

And remember, our team can assist with all your travel health requirements including vaccinations. Stay safe and happy travels!

 

Source: BetterHealth Channel, Smartraveller, Department of Health

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Man with vice

Vices: what will you give up this February?

We’ve all got our vices.

Some of us consume too much sugar, some of us drink too much alcohol, while others don’t exercise enough. The good news is there is help.

Febfast is an initiative where you can call time-out on alcohol, sugar or another vice of your choice, to support disadvantaged young people in Australia.

It’s the perfect excuse to kick-start the year with some good health and good will!

So, what vices will you focus on this February?

1. I’m giving up sugar!

Too many pavlovas, ice creams and sweet treats over the festive season? Is it time for a sugar holiday?

The issue

A lot of our energy intake now comes from processed and packaged food and drinks, like cereal and soft drinks. They often contain lots of added sugar, which isn’t great for our diet.

While eating sugar doesn’t directly cause diabetes, it can lead to weight gain if consumed in excess. Obesity is a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes – a chronic condition affecting over 1.7 million Australians.

What you can do

Challenge yourself this February to cut out the chocolate and cakes, and curb those cravings!

Some ideas to get you started: keep a food diary, check food labels before eating, swap soft drink for water, and up your intake of fresh fruit.

It’s also a good idea to chat to your doctor in Pascoe Vale before starting a diet. You could even make an appointment with Jessica Fuller, our accredited practising dietitian.

2. I’m giving up alcohol!

Are you ready for a break from the alcohol-drenched summer months and the over-indulgence of the silly season?

The issue

Alcohol is a depressant drug, which means it slows down the messages travelling between the brain and the body. There is no safe level of drug use – it always carries some risk.

Some long-term effects of alcohol use include high blood pressure, heart disease, depression and sexual health problems.

What you can do

Challenge yourself this February to banish beer and bubbles!

Some ideas to get you started: catch up over a coffee instead of at the pub, be the designated driver when you go out with your friends, and keep track of the money you’re saving by not drinking.

If you’re a regular or heavy drinker, it can be dangerous to reduce or quit alcohol on your own.

Your GP can refer you to treatment such as detox, medication and even counselling to help manage withdrawal symptoms. You can also have a chat with one of our non-judgmental psychologists in Pascoe Vale, Julie Paschke and Jenny Ricketts

3. I’m giving up Netflix!

Do you find that the only exercise you do is reaching for the remote control? Is it time to give Netflix the flick?

The issue

When you have an inactive lifestyle, your health is affected in many ways. For example, you burn fewer calories (meaning you’re more likely to gain weight), you may lose muscle strength and endurance, your bones may get weaker, and your immune system may not work as well.

By not getting regular exercise, you raise your risk of things like obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, osteoporosis, stroke – the list goes on.

What you can do

Challenge yourself this February to turn off the TV and get off the couch!

Some ideas to get you started: keep a diary of how many hours you’ve ‘saved’ by doing other activities, take the stairs instead of the lift, park your car a bit further away (forcing you to walk a little further), and give your dog two walks a day rather than one.

One of the best things you can do to get active – especially if you’re just starting out – is to have a chat with our exercise physiologist in Pascoe Vale, Mike Fitzsimon. Mike’s helpful approach will ensure you get that extra spring into your step.

Got any questions about your vices or don’t know where to start? Chat to your healthcare professional today.

 

Source: Febfast, MedlinePlus

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Stroke Pascoe Vale Melbourne

What is a stroke?

Stroke attacks the brain – the human control centre.

A stroke happens when the blood supply carrying oxygen and nutrients to the brain is interrupted. When brain cells do not get enough blood, they die at a rapid rate (up to 1.9 million brain cells every minute).

Stroke can affect people physically and emotionally, as well as the way they think – from muscle weakness and speech difficulties, to memory, hearing or vision issues.

Every stroke is different. It all depends on where in the brain the stroke occurs and how severe it is.

What are the symptoms of stroke?

Think F.A.S.T. It’s an easy way to remember the most common signs of stroke:

  • Face Check their face. Has their mouth drooped?
  • Arms Can they lift both arms?
  • Speech Is their speech slurred? Do they understand you?
  • Time Is critical. If you see any of these signs call 000 straight away.

How can you manage your risk?

There are some risk factors you cannot do anything about, like:

  • Age – the older you get the greater your risk of stroke.
  • Gender – stroke is more common in men.
  • A family history of stroke – having a parent or sibling who has had a previous stroke.
  • If you’ve had a previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA).

The good news is more than 80% of strokes can be prevented. Here are some things you can do to help reduce your stroke risk:

Raising awareness of stroke

The first week of September is National Stroke Week. It’s an annual opportunity to raise awareness of stroke and the Stroke Foundation in Australia.

The theme for National Stroke Week is F.A.S.T heroes. These heroes are everyday Australians who know and can recognise the signs of stroke. They call an ambulance straight away, potentially saving a life.

Our team of doctors and allied health professionals at PVH Medical can work with you to help manage your stroke risk.

Make the first step by booking a health check online today.

 

Source: Stroke Foundation

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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See your doctor at PVH Medical in Pascoe Vale for help with alcohol

Alcohol. Is it time to give it up?

Alcohol is a depressant drug, which means it slows down the messages travelling between the brain and the body.

There is no safe level of drug use – it always carries some risk.

How can alcohol affect you?

Alcohol affects everyone differently, based on:

  • Size, weight and health
  • Whether the person is used to taking it
  • Whether other drugs are taken around the same time
  • The amount drunk
  • The strength of the drink.

What are some of the long-term effects of alcohol?

Regular use of alcohol may eventually cause:

  • Regular colds or flu
  • Difficulty getting an erection
  • Depression
  • Poor memory and brain damage
  • Difficulty having children
  • Liver disease
  • Cancer
  • High blood pressure and heart disease
  • Needing to drink more to get the same effect
  • Dependence on alcohol
  • Financial, work and social problems.

Drinking alcohol with other drugs

The effects of drinking and taking other drugs − including over-the-counter or prescribed medications − can be unpredictable and dangerous. Always consult your healthcare professional.

About Dry July

In July, over 11,000 Australians will be diagnosed with cancer. To raise funds for people affected by cancer, Aussies are being asked to ‘go dry’ in July.

Funds raised through Dry July go towards cancer support organisations to help improve patient comfort, care and wellbeing.

Having a month off alcohol also has great health benefits, such as sleeping better, having more energy and of course, no hangovers! So you’re not only helping others, you’re helping yourself. It’s a win-win!

Getting help

If your use of alcohol is affecting your health, family, relationships, work, school, financial or other life situations, you can find help and support. You can also make an appointment to see us for a confidential chat and check-up.

 

 

Source: Alcohol and Drug Foundation

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Drink responsibly this festive season.

How to drink responsibly this party season

With Christmas and New Year’s Eve just around the corner, there are plenty of opportunities to drink alcohol.

While it’s ok to enjoy yourself during the silly season, it pays to drink responsibly. Here are some tips to help you be a responsible drinker.

1. Know your limits

Don’t drink too much, and don’t drink too quickly. In practice, this basically looks like having one drink per hour, with a non-alcoholic drink like water in between drinks. When you feel drunk, stop drinking.

2. Don’t drink and drive

If you have to drive, don’t drink. Alcohol is a depressant drug that slows down your reaction speed, which means if you need to think and act quickly, you probably won’t be able to. Make arrangements for how you’ll get home before you go out, like booking a taxi or Uber.

3. Avoid mixing alcohol and other drugs

This includes both prescription drugs and recreational drugs. Make sure you know how alcohol will react with any medications you’re on.

4. Use common sense

If it doesn’t sound like a good idea, it probably isn’t one. If you’re not comfortable with the environment you’re in or are worried about bad things happening, just call it a night.

5. Do things differently

Mix things up – be the designated driver, carry bottles of water with you, or simply turn down an invite to a boozy party. Your body will thank you for it!

Need help?

If you’ve tried drinking responsibly and it’s not working, you could have a drinking problem. The easiest and quickest way to get help is to talk to someone about it. The sooner you open up about what you’re going through, the sooner you’ll start to feel a bit better.

For a confidential chat with one of our doctors, please make a booking today.

 

Source: reachout.com

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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