Targeted exercise to help diabetes

How exercise physiology can help with diabetes (some things may surprise you)

The single factor that links all chronic disease management is exercise.

It’s a word we all know, and a concept we’ve had relationships with in the past.

The challenge for those living with diabetes is how to get the correct ‘dosage’ of exercise. What types of exercise – walking, running, skipping? Should you be lifting heavy weights or light weights? What about pilates? And what about the fads – is Zumba the best exercise for diabetes?

All of these questions have an answer. And that answer will differ from person to person.

An exercise physiologist, also known as an EP, is the professional to give you your exercise answers.

Here are four common questions our EP, Mike Fitzsimon, gets asked about diabetes. The answers may surprise you!

1. Why exercise?

Diabetes Australia recommends that everyone with diabetes does at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise every day. That’s right – every single day.

If weight loss is needed as well, then that number increases to 45-60 minutes of exercise every day.

Exercise has many positive effects on muscles, bones, joints, organs and even our brain.

With diabetes it improves our ability to process and use carbohydrates, and increases muscle and other tissue mass to better process carbs in the future. These are just some of the positive effects.

2. How do I reach my recommended exercise minimums every day?

Your EP will sit down with you and work through your history, your days, the barriers and the opportunities that you have to exercise.

They will work out what kind of exercise is best and what you like the most, and avoid what you like the least.

Exercise physiology in Pascoe Vale, Melbourne.

Exercise physiologist Mike Fitzsimon

3. Why do my blood sugars drop when exercising?

This goes back to the understanding around blood sugars being our first fuel source. When we exercise, we use the sugars as fuel.

If we don’t use them, we convert the sugars to other substances including the bad fats that float around and clog up blood vessels as well as sit around our vital organs. This can lead to high disease risks.

4. If I’m walking every day, is this enough exercise? 

The answer is no.

We all, and especially those with diabetes, need to be completing two sessions of resistance training per week as well as the daily 30 minutes of aerobic exercise.

Resistance exercises are where you use your body weight, actual weights and resistance training bands, and work muscles through their ranges to build strength and conditioning.

We’re here to help

If you’re reading this and thinking that you need some assistance meeting the recommended minimums for your exercise levels, you can rest assured knowing we have the best people qualified to help.

Our EP Mike Fitzsimon is here in Pascoe Vale and ready to help you.

There are many ways you can see Mike. You can come in for one-on-one work where you ask your questions. There’s also the actions that you need to do.

Our EP has The Strong Room where you can complete assessments and do your exercises in safety with an expert guiding you.

You can do these exercises one on one, or join some friendly small groups where you can feel supported and encouraged by others exercising together.

Make a booking today

To see Mike you can book in now online or by calling 9304 0500.

If you’re eligible for Medicare rebates (those with chronic disease, and separately those with diabetes) you can get your doctor to write up referrals. This can unlock some Medicare funding pathways to access exercise physiology.

We’d love to help you on your way to feeling great. Why not get started today?

 

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.