All posts by Mike

You may benefit from an iron infusion session in Pascoe Vale.

Get on top of your iron deficiency!

Iron is an important dietary mineral that is involved in various bodily functions, including the transport of oxygen in the blood. This is essential in providing energy for daily life.

Iron deficiency results in depleting the iron stores within your body. This can lead to fatigue, tiredness and decreased immunity.

Iron deficiency is common – are you at risk?

Iron deficiency is a common health problem. High-risk groups include menstruating women, pregnant and lactating women, babies and toddlers, teenage girls and female athletes.

Without intervention, a person whose dietary intake of iron is inadequate to meet their body’s needs will eventually deplete their iron stores and develop iron deficiency anaemia.

It is important that you see your doctor if you suspect you may be iron deficient.

Iron infusion clinics are being run at PVH Medical

An iron infusion is a minor procedure when an iron-containing medicine is infused directly into the blood circulation via a cannula (a thin tube inserted into your vein).

We’re running iron infusion clinic sessions every Tuesday and Thursday from 2-4pm. The cost is $150 for private patients and $100 for pensioners.

Book an appointment with your doctor

If you suspect you may be iron deficient and wish to attend an iron infusion session, please make a booking with your GP first.

 

Source: BetterHealth

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Find out about your risk of ovarian cancer at PVH Medical in Pascoe Vale.

Ovarian cancer – are you at risk?

Ovarian cancer is the deadliest women’s cancer.

Unfortunately, this has not changed in 30 years. Every day in Australia, four women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and three will die from the disease.

February is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. It’s held each year in Australia to raise awareness of the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer, to share the stories of real women affected by the disease, to highlight the risk factors for ovarian cancer and educate Australians on ovarian cancer diagnosis and treatment.

What are some of the risks of ovarian cancer?

We don’t know the causes of most ovarian cancer. Research into the causes of ovarian cancer is continuing in Australia and overseas.

We do know that there are some factors that may increase a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer and that there are some protective factors that may reduce a woman’s risk.

It’s important to know that many women who develop ovarian cancer do not have any known risk factors — while many women who do have risk factors never develop ovarian cancer.

Here are some of the risk factors:

  • Age: ovarian cancer is most common in women over 50 and in women who have stopped menstruating (have been through menopause), and the risk increases with age. However, ovarian cancer can affect women of all ages.
  • Genetics and family history: if a woman has two or more relatives from the same side of her family affected by ovarian, or ovarian and breast cancer her risk of developing ovarian cancer may be increased. Genetics and family history are responsible for at least 15% of ovarian cancers.
  • Child-bearing history: women who have not had children, are unable to have children, have never used oral contraceptives or have had children over the age of 30, may be slightly more at risk. This is due to ovaries not having a ‘rest’ from the break and repair of the surface of the ovary when women ovulate each month.
  • Endometriosis: this condition is when the tissue lining the uterus (endometrium) is also found outside of the uterus.
  • Lifestyle factors: such as smoking tobacco, being overweight or eating a high-fat diet.
  • Hormonal factors: including early puberty (menstruating before 12) or late menopause (onset after 50).

Take action during Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

In 2018, Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month is about making a stand – it’s time for action. You can help the cause and take action by doing the following:

Make a booking today

To see if you’re at risk of ovarian cancer, or just for a general check-up, please make a booking today. You can book online, on Facebook, on the Appointuit app or by calling 9304 0500.

 

Source: Ovarian Cancer Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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Learn how to eat healthy food with a dietitian in Pascoe Vale.

Smart eating – everyone can do it

Smart eating is a means to good nutrition, a key step towards better health for everyone.

But because we’re all unique, with differing health challenges, goals and lifestyles (for example), smart eating will mean different things to different people, and how we go about achieving it will be different too. That’s where personalised nutrition advice and support from an Accredited Practising Dietitian comes in.

How can an Accredited Practising Dietitian help?

Accredited Practising Dietitians have a lot to offer in supporting you to live a healthier life, through smart eating.

They’re nutrition scientists with at least four years’ study behind them in nutrition, food science and biochemistry. And they have the know-how to translate the science into personalised, practical advice, respecting your values and preferences, to find the best approach for you.

Importantly, they can support and motivate you to make smart eating a part of your life over the long term.

More information on dietetics

Fast facts about Accredited Practising Dietitians

Australia’s more than 5,500 dietitians work in a range of areas, including hospitals (36%), community settings (9%), private practice (31%), universities (6%), government (4%), non-government organisations (5%) and the corporate sector (5%).

But what all Accredited Practising Dietitians have in common is they:

  • Have a university degree in nutrition and dietetics
  • Give advice based on scientific evidence
  • Stay up to date through continuing professional development, and
  • Adhere to a Code of Conduct and Statement of Ethical Practice.

Smart Eating Week

They say to work smarter, not harder – but when it comes to food and nutrition, are you left wondering how to make the right choices for you?

12-18 February 2018 is Smart Eating Week. The week is run by Accredited Practising Dietitians, and supported by the Dietitians Association of Australia. The week falls at an ideal time, with the start of a new year inspiring many of us to live healthier lives, including through smart eating.

So get smart this Smart Eating Week. Connect with our Practising Dietitian at PVH Medical, Samantha Stuk.

Samamtha-Stuk

Samantha can help with nutritional well-being, treating disease, preventing nutrition-related problems, and more.

It’s easy to make a booking

It’s easy to make a booking with Samantha. You can do it online, on Facebook, on the Appointuit app on your smartphone, or you can call us on 9304 0500.

Happy Smart Eating Week!

 

Source: Dieticians Association of Australia

Note: This information is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs.

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